How popular is the baby name Freddie in the United States right now? How popular was it historically? Find out using the graph below! Plus, check out all the blog posts that mention the name Freddie.

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Popularity of the Baby Name Freddie


Posts that Mention the Name Freddie

Popular Baby Names in Providence, RI, 1868

19th-century Providence, Rhode Island
19th-century Providence

Years ago, I discovered three documents with relatively complete lists of births for the city of Providence, Rhode Island, for the years 1866, 1867, and 1868. I’ve already created Providence’s baby name rankings for 1866 and 1867 using the first two documents, and today (finally!) I’ve got the third set of rankings for you.

Let’s start with some stats:

  • 1,762 babies were born in Providence in 1868, by my count. According to the introduction of the document I’m using a source, however, the total number is 1,866. I don’t know how to account for this discrepancy.
  • 1,617 of these babies (791 girls and 826 boys) had names that were known at the time of publication. The other 145 babies got blank spaces. Either their names hadn’t been registered yet, or they hadn’t been named yet, or perhaps these babies died young and never received a name.
  • 284 unique names (143 girl names and 141 boy names) were shared among these 1,617 babies.

And now, on to the names!

Top 5

A quick look at the top 5 girl names and boy names in Providence in 1868:

Top baby girl namesTop baby boy names
1. Mary
2. Catherine
3. Sarah
4. Ellen
5. Margaret
1. John
2. William
3. James
4. Charles
5. George

All Girl Names

  1. Mary, 149 baby girls
  2. Catherine, 39
  3. Sarah, 38
  4. Ellen, 31
  5. Margaret, 28
  6. Elizabeth, 25
  7. Alice, 24
  8. Anna, 20
  9. Ann, 16
  10. Emma, 14
  11. Eliza, 13
  12. Clara & Martha, 11 each (tie)
  13. Hannah & Lucy, 10 each (tie)
  14. Bridget, Grace, Jennie, Julia & Maria, 9 each (5-way tie)
  15. Annie, Florence, Jane, Minnie & Susan, 8 each (5-way tie)
  16. Agnes, Caroline, Cora, Ella & Harriet, 7 each (5-way tie)
  17. Anne, Carrie, Hattie, Ida, Mabel & Nellie, 6 each (6-way tie)
  18. Eva, Joanna, Lydia & Rosanna, 5 each (4-way tie)
  19. Abby, Charlotte, Emily, Jessie, Josephine, Lillian, Lizzie, Louisa, Louise, Marion, Phebe, Rosella & Theresa, 4 each (13-way tie)
  20. Anastasia, Bertha, Edith, Gertrude, Isabella, Nettie, Pearl, Rebecca & Susanna, 3 each (9-way tie)
  21. Ada, Almira, Edna, Fannie, Flora, Frances, Helen, Henrietta, Inez, Laura, Lelia, Lillie, Lottie, Maud, Priscilla & Virginia, 2 each (16-way tie)
  22. Addie, Adelaide, Adelicia, Adeline, Agatha, Allene, Amanda, Amy, Angelica, Antoinette, Arabella, Augusta, Aurelia, B.*, Belle, Bessie, Betsey, Catharine, Celia, Claudia, Della, Eleanor, Eleanora, Estella, Estelle, Esther, Eudavelia, Eulalie, Evelyn, Francenia, Genevieve, Georgia, Honora, Imogene, Jesse, Juliette, Kate, Leonora, Lilla, Lillias, Lorena, Luella, Luetta, Magdalena, Marian, Marietta, Matilda, Mercy, Minerva, Miriam, Myra, Myrtis, Nanoan, Nora, Pauline, Reberta, Rhoda, Roberta, Rosa, Rose, Ruth, Sabrina, Sophia, Stella & Winifred, 1 each (65-way tie)

*What do you think the “B.” might have stood for?

All Boy Names

  1. John, 112 baby boys
  2. William, 68
  3. James, 64
  4. Charles, 52
  5. George, 45
  6. Thomas, 37
  7. Frederick, 25
  8. Henry, 23
  9. Joseph, 22
  10. Edward, 19
  11. Daniel & Patrick, 18 each (tie)
  12. Robert, 17
  13. Frank, 16
  14. Francis, 15
  15. Walter, 13
  16. Michael, 11
  17. Albert, 10
  18. Arthur, 9
  19. Benjamin, Peter & Samuel, 7 each (3-way tie)
  20. Freddie, Harry, Herbert & Stephen, 6 each (4-way tie)
  21. Edwin, Lawrence, Lewis, Martin & Timothy, 5 each (5-way tie)
  22. Bernard, Edmund, Eugene, Louis, Philip & Richard, 4 each (6-way tie)
  23. Alfred, Augustus, Christopher, Eben, Horace, Howard, Hugh, Jeremiah, Matthew & Willard, 3 each (10-way tie)
  24. Abel, Barney, Byron, Dennis, Edgar, Ferdinand, Gilbert, Luke, Max, Nathaniel, Owen, Roger, Solomon & Victor, 2 each (14-way tie)
  25. Alden, Alexis, Allen, Alrick, Amos, Andrew, Ansel, Anson, Archibald, Asa, Ashby, Bartholomew, Calvin, Carlos, Clarence, Clark, Clarke, Clement, Clifford, Collyer, Crolander, Darius, David, Earl, Elisha, Ellis, Eri, Ernest, Erwin, Eusebe, Everett, Felix, Forrest, Foster, Franklin, Fred, Gardner, Jacob, Jason, Jerome, Jireh, Joaneto, Josiah, Jubal, Justin, Lawson, Lodovic, Louis, Lucien, Lyman, Major, Malachi, Manuel, Melbourne, Monroe, Morey, Morris, Myron, Nelson, Nicholas, Olney, Orville, Oscar, Pendleton, Ralph, Reuben, Rolfe, Rowland, Rufus, Simeon, Simon, Steven, Stewart, Theodore, Ulysses*, Volney, Warren, Whiting, Willie & Winchester, 1 each (80-way tie)

*Ulysses was likely named in honor of Ulysses S. Grant, who was elected president in 1868.

Twins

Finally, nineteen sets of twins were born in Providence in 1868. (All of these twin names are accounted for in the rankings above.)

Girl-girl twinsGirl-boy twinsBoy-boy twins
Caroline & Harriet
Lucy & Lydia
Mary & Rosanna
Margaret & Mary
Lizzie & Martha
(blank) & (blank)
Anne & Thomas
Emma & Charles
Florence & William
Hannah & Josiah
Ida & John
Isabella & John
Jennie & Horace
Charles & William
Francis & Robert
George & John
James & John
James & Stephen
(blank) & (blank)

Have any thoughts about these rankings, or any of the specific names above?

Source: Snow, Edwin M. Alphabetical Lists of the Names of Persons Deceased, Born and Married in the City of Providence. Number three. Providence: Millard & Harker, 1870.

Where did the baby name Wynton come from?

wynton, baby name, 1960s
Wynton Kelly

Wynton is a name doubly associated with jazz.

First there was jazz pianist Wynton Kelly, born in Jamaica in 1931. He’s best known for being part of Miles Davis’ band starting in 1959, including an appearance on Kind of Blue (1959), which would become one of the greatest jazz records of all time. (He played in the song “Freddie Freeloader.”)

Around the same time, the baby name Wynton began appearing in the U.S. baby name data:

  • 1963: 6 baby boys named Wynton
  • 1962: unlisted
  • 1961: unlisted
  • 1960: 8 baby boys named Wynton [debut]
  • 1959: unlisted
  • 1958: unlisted
wynton marsalis, baby name, 1980s
Wynton Marsalis

In 1961, New Orleans jazz pianist Ellis Marsalis welcomed a baby boy and named him Wynton in honor of his friend Wynton Kelly.

Little Wynton went on to become an internationally famous jazz trumpeter, winning eight Grammy Awards from 1983 to 1987 and playing the national anthem at Super Bowl XX [vid] in New Orleans in January of 1986. His success not only gave new life to the name Wynton, but it put the name Marsalis on the map:

YearWynton usageMarsalis usage
198819 baby boys13 baby boys
198722 baby boys12 baby boys
198627 baby boys13 baby boys [debut]
198517 baby boys(unlisted)
198423 baby boys(unlisted)
1983(unlisted)(unlisted)

The surname Marsalis is thought to be a Dutch variant of the French surname Marchal, which was originally an occupational/status name meaning “marshal.”

I can think of just two other names that with similar usage stories (i.e., influenced twice by two different people working in the same field, with the second person being a namesake of the first): Ryne and Damita.

What are your thoughts on the baby name Wynton?

Sources:

Rare Girl Names from Early Cinema: F

fredi

On the hunt for a rare girl name with a retro feel?

Here’s a long list of uncommon female F-names associated with early cinema (1900s-1940s). Each of the names below is either a character name or an actress name from that era. For those names that have seen enough usage to appear in the SSA data, I’ve included links to the popularity graphs.

*

Fabienne
Fabienne was a character name in multiple films, including Fazil (1928) and The Doctor and the Girl (1949).

  • Usage of the baby name Fabienne (which debuted in the data in 1949).

Fadette
Fadette was a character name in multiple films, including Fanchon, the Cricket (1915) and The Inner Chamber (1915).

Faire
Faire Binney was an actress who appeared in films from the 1910s to the 1950s. She was born in New Jersey in 1900. Her birth name was Frederica Gertrude Binney. Faire was also a character played by actress Frances Dade in the film The She-Wolf (1931).

Falfi
Falfi Tumble was a character played by actress Marjorie Daw in the film Fear-Bound (1925).

Faline
Faline was an animated character in the film Bambi (1942).

  • Usage of the baby name Faline (which debuted in the data in 1943).

Fanchette
Fanchette was a character name in multiple films, including A Million a Minute (1916) and The Daring of Diana (1916).

Fanchon
Fanchon was a character name in multiple films, including Fanchon, the Cricket (1915) and The Clown (1927).

Fancy
Fancy was a character name in multiple films, including The Heart Line (1921) and The Fighting O’Flynn (1949).

  • Usage of the baby name Fancy.

Fanette
Fanette was a character name in multiple films, including Money Mad (1918) and A Gamble with Hearts (1923).

Fania
Fania Marinoff was an actress who appeared in films in the 1910s. She was born in Russia (now Ukraine) in 1890. Fania was also a character name in multiple films, including When a Girl Loves (1924) and The Yellow Ticket (1931).

  • Usage of the baby name Fania.

Fanina
Fanina was a character played by actress Carmen Phillips in the film The Man Who Turned White (1919).

Fannia
Fannia was a character played by actress Ann Rork in the film The Blonde Saint (1926).

Fantasca
Fantasca was a character played by actress Alice Joyce in the short film Fantasca, the Gipsy (1912).

Fanutza
Fanutza was a character played by actress Margaret Loomis in the film Law of the Lawless (1923).

Farina
Farina was a character played by actress Gloria Swanson in the film The Fable of Elvira and Farina and the Meal Ticket (1915).

  • Usage of the baby name Farina.

Faun
Faun was a character played by actress Inez Courtney in the film Big City Blues (1932).

  • Usage of the baby name Faun.

Fauvette
Fauvette was a character played by actress Elsie Ferguson in the film His Parisian Wife (1919).

Fay
Fay Tincher was an actress who appeared in films from the 1910s to the 1920s. She was born in Kansas in 1884. Fay Bainter was an actress who appeared in films from the 1930s to the 1960s. She was born in California in 1893. Fay Wray (of King Kong fame) was an actress who appeared in films from the 1920s to the 1950s. She was born in Canada in 1907. Her birth name was Vina Fay Wray. Fay was also a character name in multiple films, including The Rainbow Trail (1925) and Stage Kisses (1927).

  • Usage of the baby name Fay.

Fayaway
Fayaway was a character played by actress Raquel Torres in the film White Shadows in the South Seas (1928).

Fedora
Fedora was a character name in multiple films, including Fedora (1918) and The Woman from Moscow (1928).

  • Usage of the baby name Fedora.

Felicitas
Felicitas was a character played by actress Greta Garbo in the film Flesh and the Devil (1926).

Femie
Femie was a character played by actress Neva Gerber in the short film Billie, the Hillbilly (1915).

Fenella
Fenella was a character name in multiple films, including A Man of His Word (1915) and Name the Man (1924).

Ferike
Ferike Boros was an actress who appeared in films in from the 1910s to the 1940s. She was born in Austria-Hungary (now Romania) in 1880.

Fernande
Fernande was a character played by actress Bodil Rosing in the film Roberta (1935).

Fernie
Fernie Schmidt was a character played by actress Colleen Moore in the film It Must Be Love (1926).

  • Usage of the baby name Fernie.

Fernway
Fernway de la Fer was a character played by actress Lena Horne in the film Broadway Rhythm (1944).

Fiammetta
Fiammetta was a character played by actress Marion Leonard in the short film An Awful Moment (1908).

Fidelia
Fidelia was a character played by actress Armida in the film General Crack (1930).

Fieda
Fieda Druse was a character played by actress Ann Little in the film The World for Sale (1918).

Fifi
Fifi D’Orsay was an actress who appeared in films from the 1920s to the 1960s. She was born in Canada in 1904. Her birth name was Marie-Rose Angelina Yvonne Lussier. Fifi was also a character name in multiple films, including The Blackbird (1926) and While Paris Sleeps (1932).

  • Usage of the baby name Fifi.

Filina
Filina was a character played by various actresses (such as Blanche Cornwall and Clara Beyers) in various movies called Mignon, all based on the 1866 opera of the same name.

Filomena
Filomena was a character played by actress Rafaela Ottiano in the film All Men Are Enemies (1934).

Fiora
Fiora Bixby was a character played by actress Barbara Brown in the film Arthur Takes Over (1948).

  • Usage of the baby name Fiora.

Fioretta
Fioretta was a character name in multiple films, including The Conspiracy of the Crazy (1941) and Song of Scheherazade (1947).

Flametta
Flametta was a character played by actress Marion Leonard in the short film The Duke’s Plan (1910).

Flavia
Flavia Arcaro was an actress who appeared in films from the 1910s to the 1930s. She was born in Texas in 1876. Flavia was also a character name in multiple films, including Ponjola (1923) and The Prisoner of Zenda (1937).

  • Usage of the baby name Flavia.

Fleur
Fleur Forsyte was a character played by actress Barbara La Marr in the film The White Monkey (1925).

  • Usage of the baby name Fleur.

Fleurette
Fleurette was a character name in multiple films, including Heart’s Desire (1917) and It Happened in New York (1935).

Fleurie
Fleurie was a character played by actress Christiane Yves in the film They Had to See Paris (1929).

Fleurique
Fleurique was a character played by actress Thelma Leeds in the film The Toast of New York (1937).

Flo
Flo was a character name in multiple films, including The Labyrinth (1915) and G. I. Honeymoon (1945).

  • Usage of the baby name Flo.

Florabel
Florabel Thurston was a character played by actress Florence Baker in the short film The Course of True Love (1910).

Florabelle
Florabelle was a character name in multiple films, including The Case of the Curious Bride (1935) and Wives Never Know (1936).

Florella
Florella was a character played by actress Nina Mae McKinney in the film Dark Waters (1944).

Florelle
Florelle was an actress who appeared in films from the 1910s to the 1950s. She was born in France in 1898. Her birth name was Odette Elisa Joséphine Marguerite Rousseau.

Florentine
Florentine Fair was a character played by actress Cleo Madison in the film The Lure of Youth (1921).

Floretta
Floretta was a character played by actress Ruth Clifford in the short film The Keeper of the Gate (1917).

Florette
Florette was a character name in multiple films, including Indiscreet Corinne (1917) and Lilies of the Field (1924).

Floria
Floria was a character name in multiple films, including The Barbarian (1921) and Breezing Home (1937).

  • Usage of the baby name Floria.

Florianne
Florianne was a character played by various actresses (such as Mary Thurman and Genevieve Tobin) in various movies called Zaza, all based on the 1898 play of the same name.

Florida
Florida Kingsley was an actress who appeared in films from the 1910s to the 1920s. She was born in Florida in 1867. Florida was also a character played by actress Maude George in the film The Frame-Up (1915).

Florie
Florie Watson was a character played by actress Ona Munson in the film The Cheaters (1945).

  • Usage of the baby name Florie.

Florine
Florine Hanna was an actress who appeared in 1 film in 1916. She was born in Kentucky in 1883. Florine was also a character name in multiple films, including The Rose of Paris (1924) and Broadway Babies (1929).

Florrie
Florrie was a character name in multiple films, including Bells of San Juan (1922) and Murder by an Aristocrat (1936).

Floss
Floss was a character played by actress Madge Kennedy in the film The Blooming Angel (1920).

  • Usage of the baby name Floss.

Flossie
Flossie was a character name in multiple films, including A Deal in Diamonds (short, 1915) and Little Miss Broadway (1938).

Flossy
Flossy was a character played by actress Gwen Lee in the film Sharp Shooters (1928).

  • Usage of the baby name Flossy.

Flotilda
Flotilda was a character played by actress Nina Mae McKinney in the film The Power of the Whistler (1945).

Flotilla
Flotilla was a character played by actress Florence Turner in the short film Flotilla the Flirt (1914).

Fola
Fola Dale was a character played by actress Lila Lee in the film A Bit of Heaven (1928).

  • Usage of the baby name Fola.

Follette
Follette Marsh was a character played by actress Mary Astor in the film The Lost Squadron (1932).

Fortuna
Fortuna Donnelly was a character played by actress May Allison in the film Castles in the Air (1919).

Fortune
Fortune Chedsoye was a character played by actress Kathlyn Williams in the film The Carpet from Bagdad (1915).

  • Usage of the baby name Fortune (which debuted in the data as a girl name the year after The Carpet from Bagdad came out.)

Foxey
Foxey Dennison was a character played by actress Joyce Compton in the film Affairs of a Gentleman (1934).

Francelia
Francelia Billington was an actress who appeared in films from the 1910s to the 1930s. She was born in Texas in 1895.

Francey
Francey was a character name in multiple films, including Dead End (1937) and Vivacious Lady (1938).

Franchette
Franchette was a character played by actress Helen Dunbar in the short film Mrs. Trenwith Comes Home (1914).

Francie
Francie Callahan was a character played by actress Arline Judge in the film Harvard, Here I Come! (1941).

Francine
Francine was a character name in multiple films, including Francine (short, 1914) and High Pressure (1932).

Franzi
Franzi was a character played by actress Claudette Colbert in the film The Smiling Lieutenant (1931).

Freda
Freda was a character name in multiple films, including Many Waters (1931) and Hard Steel (1942).

  • Usage of the baby name Freda.

Freddie
Winifred “Freddie” Jones was a character played by actress Betty Grable in the film The Beautiful Blonde from Bashful Bend (1949).

Frederica
Frederica was a character played by actress Irene Rich in the film Beau Brummel (1924).

Frederika
Frederika was a character name in multiple films, including Confessions of a Queen (1925) and White Hunter (1936).

Fredi
Fredi Washington was an actress who appeared in films from the 1920s to the 1930s. She was born in Georgia in 1903. Her birth name was Fredericka Carolyn Washington.

  • Usage of the baby name Fredi.

Frieda
Frieda Inescort was an actress who appeared in films from the 1930s to the 1960s. She was born in Scotland in 1901. Frieda was also a character played by actress Evelyn Brent in the film Spy Train (1943).

  • Usage of the baby name Frieda.

Fritzi
Fritzi Massary was an actress who appeared in films from the 1900s to the 1920s. She was born in Austria-Hungary (now Austria) in 1882. Her birth name was Friederike Massaryk. Fritzi Brunette was an actress who appeared in films from the 1910s to the 1940s. She was born in Georgia in 1890. Her birth name was Florence Brunet. Fritzi Ridgeway was an actress who appeared in films from the 1910s to the 1930s. She was born in Montana in 1898. Fritzi was also a character name in multiple films, including Broadway Arizona (1917) and One Heavenly Night (1931).

  • Usage of the baby name Fritzi.

Fulvia
Princess Fulvia was a character played by actress Vola Vale in the film Zollenstein (1917).

Furja
Furja was a character played by actress Blanche Friderici in the film Fleetwing (1928).

…Which of the above F-names do you like best?

Source: IMDb

Popular and Unusual Baby Names in Ireland, 2018

According to data from Ireland’s Central Statistics Office (CSO), the most popular baby names in the country in 2018 were again Emily and Jack.

Here are Ireland’s top 10 girl names and top 10 boy names of 2018:

Girl Names

  1. Emily
  2. Grace
  3. Emma
  4. Sophie
  5. Amelia
  6. Ella
  7. Ellie
  8. Mia
  9. Ava
  10. Fiadh (pronounced fee-ah)

Boy Names

  1. Jack
  2. James
  3. Noah
  4. Conor
  5. Daniel
  6. Harry
  7. Luke
  8. Michael
  9. Adam
  10. Charlie

In the girls’ top 10, Ella, Ellie, and Fiadh replaced Hannah (now 11th), Lucy (13th), and Chloe (16th). The Irish name Fiadh* comes from the word fia, which means “wild” — in a “wild animal” or “wild deer” sense specifically. (Many sources oversimplify the definition by reducing it to “deer.”)

In the boys’ top 10, Charlie replaced Sean (now both 13th & 74th — see below for an explanation).

New entrants to the girls’ top 100 were Ada, Bella, Bonnie and Ivy. Ada and Ivy were the fastest climbers.

New entrants to the boys’ top 100 were Frankie, Freddie and Theodore. Theodore and Frankie were the fastest climbers.

Something else new to the rankings in 2018? The síneadh fada — an important Irish diacritic that indicates a long vowel. (In Irish, the word síneadh means “stretching” or “prolongation” and the word fada means “long.”) This is what pushed longtime top-five name Sean out of the top 10 entirely in 2018. “Sean” and “Seán” are now being counted as separate names. Currently, Seán ranks 13th while fada-less Sean is way down in 74th place.

Speaking of names with relatively low placement on the list, baby names bestowed just three times each in Ireland last year included…

  • Rare girl names: Aodhla, Erris, Fódla, Rahela, Seoda, Ugne, Xenia
  • Rare boy names: Connla, Iarfhlaith, Liam Óg, Lughaidh, Seánie, Sionnach, Zente

Sources: Irish Babies’ Names 2018: Introduction, Babies’ Names 2018 Tables, CSO baby names list features síneadh fada for first time
Image: © 2019 CSO

*The name Fiadh debuted in the U.S. data in 2018.

Name Quotes #71: Floy, Zyler, Tane Mahuta

Rami Malek, after winning the Oscar for Best Actor in early 2019 [vid]:

I grew up in a world where I never thought I was gonna play the lead on Mr. Robot because I never saw anyone in a lead role that looked like me. I never thought that I could possibly play Freddie Mercury until I realized his name was Farrokh Bulsara. […] That was the motivation that allowed me to say, “Oh, I can do this.”

Winnie Harlow, born Chantelle Brown-Young, upon being asked where the name “Winnie Harlow” came from:

It’s literally just from Winnie the Pooh! I was a big fan growing up, and it was actually from a joke with some friends. We were on the phone with some boys, I grabbed the phone from one of my girls, and was like, “Don’t give my friends attitude!” And the boys asked, “Who is this?” I looked over, my friend was wearing a Winnie the Pooh T-shirt, so I said my name was Winnie. When I started working, it felt kind of natural to just continue with it. Harlow comes from Jean Harlow; I’m a really big Marilyn Monroe fan, but I didn’t want to use Monroe, because that felt cheesy. But Jean Harlow was one of Marilyn’s really big career inspirations, so I took the name Harlow. I do love my actual name a lot. At the beginning, I tried to go by Chantelle Winnie, but then decided to keep Winnie Harlow and Chantelle separate. My family calls me Chantelle.

Monica Lewinsky, on “the Monica Lewinsky scandal” of early 1998:

“The scandal was named after me,” she said. “Any time that this has been referenced, every single day, every single day in the past 20 years — so it may not be a direct reference to me, but because the investigation and the scandal have my name, I’m then, therefore, attached to it.”

[…]

“Bill Clinton didn’t have to change his name,” Lewinsky said, when Oliver asked if she considered changing hers. “Nobody’s ever asked him, did he think he should change his name.”

From an article about an 11-year-old golf player who happens to have been named for the Ryder cup:

With a name like Ryder, practicing golf at a young [age] is no accident. Ryan Carlson says, yes, his son’s name is inspired by the Ryder Cup, but he didn’t expect he’d be such a natural. Shortly after he began to walk, Ryder began swinging a plastic golf club, quickly learning how to hit balls.

From an article about Southern names (via Abby):

[W]hen Southerners make up new names, it’s usually a more meaningful exercise than simply slapping a K where it does not belong, like when people name their girls after their daddies. This results in the likes of Raylene, Bobette, Earline, Georgette (one of George Jones’s daughters), Georgine, and my personal favorite, Floy (feminine for Floyd). As it happens, I almost got a masculine name (unfeminized) myself. I was named after my maternal grandmother, Julia Evans Clements Brooks, and my mother was dead set on calling me Evans until my father put his foot down on the grounds that that was the kind of stuff that Yankees did. Maybe, but we do plenty of the last name/family name business for girls down here, too. Off the top of my head I can think of three Southern women I love a lot: Keith, Cameron, Egan.

From an article comparing the relative popularity of twin professional hockey players Daniel and Henrik Sedin by looking at the B.C. baby name data:

[T]he name Henrik magically first started appearing on B.C. baby announcements in 2007, which, maybe not so coincidentally, was also the year following the Sedins’ breakout season.

[…]

Interestingly, the largest spike — a total of 13 baby Henriks — came in 2011, which coincides with the Canucks’ march to the Stanley Cup Final.

From an article about “theybies” — kids being brought up without gender designations:

Three-year-old twins Zyler and Kadyn Sharpe scurried around the boys and girls clothing racks of a narrow consignment store filled with toys. Zyler, wearing rainbow leggings, scrutinized a pair of hot-pink-and-purple sneakers. Kadyn, in a T-Rex shirt, fixated on a musical cube that flashed colorful lights. At a glance, the only discernible difference between these fraternal twins is their hair — Zyler’s is brown and Kadyn’s is blond.

Is Zyler a boy or a girl? How about Kadyn? That’s a question their parents, Nate and Julia Sharpe, say only the twins can decide.

How did presidential candidate Robert Francis O’Rourke acquire the nickname Beto?

He was named after his grandfathers. His mother Melissa O’Rourke said on the campaign trail during his U.S. Senate run that “Robert” — her father’s name — didn’t seem to fit when he was a baby.

The family has deep roots in El Paso, Texas, and “Beto” is a common shortening of the name “Roberto,” or “Robert.” If you’re wondering, it’s pronounced BEH-toe and O’Rourke is oh-RORK.

From an article about America’s first exascale supercomputer:

The supercomputer, dubbed Aurora — which [Secretary of Energy Rick] Perry joked was named after his three-legged black lab Aurora Pancake — is scheduled to be fully operational by the end of 2021, as the DOE attempts to keep pace with China in a supercomputing arms race.

(Turns out the dog’s nickname is “Rory.” I posted a quote about another named computer, the Lisa, last year.)

From an article about the divorce of Lady Davina Windsor, 30th in line to the British throne, from husband Gary “Gazza” Lewis, a Maori sheep shearer:

Lady Davina gave birth to a daughter, Senna Kowhai, who is now aged eight, and a son, Tane Mahuta, six. He was named after the giant Tane Mahuta kauri tree in the Waipoua Forest, in New Zealand.

(Here’s more on the famous Tane Mahuta tree. The name Kowhai was also inspired by New Zealand tree.)