How popular is the baby name Kojo in the United States right now? How popular was it historically? Find out using the graph below! Plus, see baby names similar to Kojo and check out all the blog posts that mention the name Kojo.

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Popularity of the Baby Name Kojo

Number of Babies Named Kojo

Born in the U.S. Since 1880

Posts that Mention the Name Kojo

Baby Names Typed by the Right Hand – Better?

Years ago, I came up with a list of one-handed baby names — that is, names that are typed with either the left hand or the right hand on a QWERTY keyboard.

Turns out there may be a slight advantage to right-hand names.

According to a study published recently in Psychonomic Bulletin and Review, “the QWERTY keyboard may gradually attach more positive meanings to words with more letters located on the right side of the layout (everything to the right of T, G and B).”

Why?

It has to do with fluency.

We tend to like simplicity over complexity, and the harder-to-type letter pairs are on a QWERTY keyboard’s left side — these two facts together may lead people to prefer words (and names) that are typed on the right.

Which names are typed by the right hand only? My original list:

  • Holly
  • Io
  • Jill, Jim, Jimi, Jimmy, Jin, Jo, John, Johnny, Jon, Joni, Joy, Juho, Juli, Julio, Jun, Juno
  • Kiki, Kim, Kimi, Kimiko, Kimmy, Kimo, Kip, Kiyoko, Kojo, Kollin, Kumiko, Kyou
  • Lili, Lilly, Lilou, Lily, Lin, Lino, Loni, Lonny, Lou, Lulu, Lyn, Lynn
  • Miki, Mikki, Mikko, Milly, Milo, Mimi, Min, Minh, Miyu, Molly, Momoko
  • Nik, Nikhil, Niki, Nikki, Niko, Nikol, Nikon, Nuno
  • Olli, Olujimi, Om
  • Phil, Philip, Phillip, Pio, Polly, Poppy
  • Yoko, Yuko, Yumi, Yumiko

Can you think of any others?

Source: The QWERTY Effect: How Typing May Shape the Meaning of Words (h/t Anthony Mitchell, @aem76us)


Ethnic/Black Names and the Job Hunt

Yesterday, someone tried to leave the following comment on my Dijonnaise post:

And every one of them was black. Guaranteed.

I didn’t approve the comment, but I did find it interesting. And timely.

Several days ago, reader C in DC directed me to a transcript of The Kojo Nnamdi Show. This particular show had to do with the issues/struggles female prisoners face upon release. One caller suggested that black-sounding first names may impede reintegration:

I have known three black women, one of whom was incarcerated previously, and the other two had difficulties in their life that didn’t involve incarceration. And all three of them had birth names on their birth certificate, names like Shiquanda (sp?) or Jamezeta (sp?), names that basically screamed out, you know, I was born black, poor neighborhood

The caller noted that all three women “ended up legally changing their names” and “they all experienced considerable success after that change.”

Who knows if the caller was telling the truth, but he could be–it’s not outside of the realm of possibility–and that’s the important part.

Several studies and mounds of anecdotal evidence suggest that snap judgments about names may keep certain people (or, more significantly, certain groups of people) from being treated fairly when they apply for jobs.

And I’m not just talking about African-American names. I’m talking Spanish (“Mexican”) names, Muslim/Arabic names…just about any name that doesn’t sound mainstream or “white.”

I’m also not just talking about the United States. This type of discrimination has been observed in New Zealand, Australia, Germany, and other places with minority populations.

The Kojo Nnamdi caller brings up a good point: some names can indeed be a hindrance. Here’s a telling quote from résumé consultant Tammy Kabell:

I’ve had frank discussions with HR managers and hiring mangers in the corporate world, and they tell me when they see a name that’s ethnic or a black name, they perceive that person as having low education or coming from a lower socioeconomic class.

So what advice should we give former female prisoners with names like Shiquanda and Jamezeta who are having trouble getting a job?

Do we mention that people with more common (“whiter”) names sometimes have an easier time landing an interview? Do we suggest that they use their first initial instead of their first name? Do we recommend they take the drastic step of legally changing their first name? Or…is it racist to even make suggestions like these?

Would love to hear your thoughts.

(Also, thank you to C in DC for sending me the link to the transcript!)

Sources:

Popular and Unique Names in Alberta, Canada in 2006

These will likely be updated soon, so I wanted to post about them before they became old news…

These were Alberta‘s top baby names in 2006:

For Girls For Boys
1. Ava
2. Emma
3. Emily
4. Hannah
5. Madison
6. Sarah
7. Abigail
8. Olivia
9. Grace
10. Ella
1. Ethan
2. Joshua
3. Jacob
4. Logan
5. Matthew
6. Noah
7. Nathan
8. Liam
9. Carter
10. William

And these were some of the unusual names bestowed in Alberta that same year:

Girl Names Boy Names
Appeline, Aristotle, Autumn-Jewels, Ayodele, Ayverée, Beimnet, Bhoomi, Callahan, Charlatan, Chyme, Corinthian, Czarina, Dhiksha, Drishti, Dusty-Storm, Eleftheria, Elgin, Eshroop, Feyisope, FleurdeMay, Freshelle, Ginaovaline, Gjoa, Gladness, Hiwot, Huntter, Imonitie, Iqraa, Irish, Ishnoort, Jazznoor, Jeytsun, Kashf, Kimjot, Kindred, Kohl, KoJo, Krymson, Lana-Salam-Amil, Lexington, Loveday, Mephew, Mirical, Misty-Jade, Moeaqic, Morningstar, Muzn, Myatta, Nghi, NuEmi, Ocean-Joy, Phancie, Phull, Pneet, Pope, Prissy, Qalkidan, Raya-Sun, Rehap-Allislame, Riverine, Rooaa, Salestial, Sheridtton, Sneha, Spirt, Starlight, Sumr, SunShine, Taylor-Judith-Lynn, Tequila, Trail-Dancer, Trillion, Tymber, Uririnoghene, Vritika, Wichan, Yram, Zailey, Zealand, Zyryll A.K.I.L., Ainnelhyethum, Atreyu, Banderas, Brigz, Catcher, Chancellor, Cimmaron, Cobain, Coo-nah, Corny, Creedence, Detroit, Dezzmen, Diezel-Blaze, DoTayne-Tebekew-Belachew, Drizz, Dutch, Elolo, Erilinyth, Eryx, Essay, Excell, Ferozudin, Fopefoluwa, Frost, Gleb, Guardian, Gurmoney, Harrattanbir, Isaiah-Mikael-Tafari, Jacob-Danny-Micheal, Jihad, Jupinder, J’zyn, Kalixto, Keltic, Krrish, Kuothnyuer, Kwynton, Lavindu, Leviathan, Lovedeep, Lyth, Mavricky, Morningsky, Morphious, Naufil, Nozzey, Nvuselelo, Okello, Olt, Pipehgwance, Princeraj, Promesse, Qazi, Raddix, Ryic, Rylee-Kris, Sachalsultan, Sawyrr, Shashwat, Shlok, Siwoo, Shooter, Skipper, Sweetgrassman, Tgn, Trennis, Truth, Vraj, WhiteElk, Willex, Winandus, Wol, Xzyler, Yug, Zarry, Zhakirullah, Zinedine

Source: Service Alberta

One-Handed Baby Names – Jimmy, Carter, Tessa, Lynn

When you sign your first name, you use one hand. But when you type it, chances are you need to use both hands — even if your name is a short as Emma, Gus or Ty.

Have you ever wondered which names can be touch-typed on the standard QWERTY keyboard with one hand only? Me too, so I came up with some lists. Let’s check out the left-handed names first, since there are a lot more of them, then right-handed names.

left-handed baby names

Left-Handed Baby Names

  • Ace, Ada, Asa, Ava
  • Babette, Barbara, Barrett, Baxter, Bess, Bette, Brad, Brett
  • Cade, Caesar, Cara, Carter, Casara, Case, Cass, Cesar
  • Dara, Dave, Dax, Debra, Dee, Dessa, Dexter, Drew
  • Ed, Edgar, Edward, Egas, Esta, Etta, Eva, Eve, Everard, Everett, Evette, Ezra
  • Freeda, Fred, Fredda
  • Gage, Garret, Garrett, Gerard, Grace, Greg, Greta, Grete, Gretta
  • Rebeca, Rebecca, Reece, Reed, Reese, Retta, Reva, Rex
  • Sabra, Sage, Sara, Steve, Stewart, Svea
  • Tad, Ted, Tara, Tate, Tera, Teresa, Tess, Tessa, Tex, Trace, Tracee
  • Vera, Vesta, Vester
  • Wade, Wafa, Ward, Wes
  • Zada, Zara, Zed

How funny is it that Dexter, which comes directly from the Latin word for “right,” is typed with the left hand only?

right-handed baby names

Right-Handed Baby Names

  • Holly
  • Io
  • Jill, Jim, Jimi, Jimmy, Jin, Jo, John, Johnny, Jon, Joni, Joy, Juho, Juli, Julio, Jun, Juno
  • Kiki, Kim, Kimi, Kimiko, Kimmy, Kimo, Kip, Kiyoko, Kojo, Kollin, Kumiko, Kyou
  • Lili, Lilly, Lilou, Lily, Lin, Lino, Loni, Lonny, Lou, Lulu, Lyn, Lynn
  • Miki, Mikki, Mikko, Milly, Milo, Mimi, Min, Minh, Miyu, Molly, Momoko
  • Nik, Nikhil, Niki, Nikki, Niko, Nikol, Nikon, Nuno
  • Olli, Olujimi, Om
  • Phil, Philip, Phillip, Pio, Polly, Poppy
  • Yoko, Yuko, Yumi, Yumiko

I realize that QWERTY “handedness” is not a major baby-naming factor for most people, but I do think it would be cute to pair a one-handed name with another one-handed name — maybe a surname (Teresa Garza, Phillip Hill) or a twin name (Edward & John, Grace & Lily, Zara & Milo). What do you think?