How popular is the baby name Loveday in the United States right now? How popular was it historically? Find out using the graph below! Plus, check out all the blog posts that mention the name Loveday.

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Popularity of the Baby Name Loveday


Posts that Mention the Name Loveday

Name Quotes #101: Nick, Nylic, Honeysuckle

Singer/rapper Lil Nas X talking about his birth name [vid], Montero Hill, on The Tonight Show Starring Jimmy Fallon in early 2021:

Jimmy: So, where does Montero come from?

Nas: Ok, it’s slightly embarrassing, but not embarrassing. So my mom wanted the car, the Montero, you know? And she never got one…

Jimmy: What’s a Montero?

Nas: It’s a Mitsubishi. So, yeah, I’m named after a car.

From the 2004 book The Agassi Story, in which Andre Agassi‘s father, Emanoul, recounts renting a room on his first night in America (after emigrating from Armenia):

“Name?” asked the clerk.

Names are so important; they have so much to do with an individual’s personality, with what kind of person he or she becomes. Take the name Phil. Have you ever met a Phil who wasn’t easygoing? My oldest son is named Phil, Phillip, and that’s just what he is: Easygoing. Or consider the name Andre. It’s an aggressive name, a flamboyant name, and that’s just how my son Andre turned out to be.

So I thought a moment, and answered “Mike Agassi.” Mike was a simple name and I liked it. It sounded American. Honorable. More importantly, it was a name I could spell.

From an article about professional baseball player Nick Solak in the Dallas News:

Nick Solak is named after a sports bar.

[…]

Back in the 1980s, Nick’s Sports Page sat on the triangular plot of land where Chicago Road and Lincoln Avenue intersected in Dolton, Ill., one of those working-class suburbs on the South Side of Chicago. The exterior featured shaker shingles, chocolate-stained diagonal sheathing and baseball bats for door handles. On Feb. 5, 1985, it hosted Carlton Fisk Night, where patrons could meet the White Sox catcher, whose work ethic screamed South Sider, even if he actually grew up in New England.

Nobody recalls if South Siders Mark Solak or Roseann, née Pawlak, took home Fisk’s autograph, but they did take home each other’s phone numbers. Four years later, they were married. And when they were about to start a family in 1995, Nick — OK, officially, Nicholas — was the clear choice for a boy. They both liked the name. Plus, it had sentimental value as a nod to their South Side roots.

From a 2013 article about actress Honeysuckle Weeks in the Independent:

With the names Honeysuckle Weeks and Charity Wakefield starring in the UK premiere production of These Shining Lives directed by Loveday Ingram, you can only imagine what rehearsals are like. It sounds as if they should all be in a Jilly Cooper novel – not a hard-hitting play about employees’ rights in the workplace.

From the book Strange Fascination (2012) by David Buckley, the story of how singer David Bowie (born David Jones) chose his stage name:

‘Bowie’, pronounced by the man himself and all his ‘die-hard’ fans to rhyme with ‘slowie’, as opposed to ‘wowie!’ as used by most ‘casual fans’ and chat-show presenters, was chosen for its connection with the Bowie knife. Jim Bowie (pronounced to rhyme with ‘phooey’) was a Texan adventurer who died at the Alamo in 1836, and carried a single-bladed hunting knife. Bowie’s description of why he chose the name is typically highly ambiguous. In the 70s, Bowie proclaimed that the knife signalled a desire to cut through lies to reveal hidden truths (a highly ironic comment, [given] Bowie’s capacity for deceit), while in a recent Radio 1 interview he said that he liked the connotations of a blade being sharpened from both sides, a signifier for all sorts of ambiguities. In fact, the Bowie knife has only one cutting edge, and is not double-bladed. This mistaken belief was held not just by Bowie, but by William Burroughs too. The choice of stage name nevertheless indicated a sense of being able to cut both ways, perfect for the pluralistic 60s. The name also derived, despite its association with Americana (a connection the English David was obviously happy about, his whole career musically being an English take on a largely American form), from a Scottish heritage, and Bowie quite liked that regional distinctiveness, too.

From a 2004 article about the usage of brand names as personal names in the Baltimore Sun:

When Virginia Hinton, a professor emeritus at Kennesaw State University, was researching a book on the history of St. Stephen’s Episcopal Church in Milledgeville, Ga., she came across a girl named Nylic who was born around 1900. Nylic’s mother was an organist at the church, and her father was the local representative for the New York Life Insurance Co. — abbreviated NYLIC.

Popular baby names in England and Wales, 2017

According to the UK’s Office for National Statistics (ONS), the most popular baby names in England and Wales last year were again Olivia and Oliver.

Here are the top 10 girl names and top 10 boy names of 2017:

Girl Names
1. Olivia, 5,204 baby girls
2. Amelia, 4,358
3. Isla, 3,373
4. Ava, 3,289
5. Emily, 3,121
6. Isabella, 2,627
7. Mia, 2,590
8. Poppy, 2,527
9. Ella, 2,452
10. Lily, 2,405

Boy Names
1. Oliver, 6,259 baby boys
2. Harry, 5,031
3. George, 4,929
4. Noah, 4,273
5. Jack, 4,190
6. Jacob, 3,968
7. Leo, 3,781
8. Oscar, 3,738
9. Charlie, 3,724
10. Muhammad, 3,691

In 2016, the #1 names were the same.

In the girls’ top 10, Poppy replaced Jessica (now 15th).

In the boys’ top 10, Leo replaced Thomas (now 13th).

Sarah has dropped out of the girls’ top 100, and now Elizabeth is the only girl name that has been in the top 100 continually since 1904, when the records began.

For a longer set of rankings, check out the 100 most popular names at the blog British Baby Names.

Finally, here are some rare baby names that were given to exactly 3 babies in England and Wales last year:

Rare Girl NamesRare Boy Names
Azmia, Buddug, Clemmie, Dunia, Elham, Figgy, Ghalia, Harpa, Izna, Japleen, Keavie, Loveday, Massa, Nectaria, Oghosa, Princy, Rym, Skaiste, Tarteel, Umi, Vinisha, Wiam, Yukta, ZuzuArlowe, Birch, Cledwyn, Diggory, Excel, Finlo, Gwydion, Hewie, Indio, Jetson, Kavarli, Laker, Moksh, Nhyira, Osazee, Philemon, Roj, Swaley, Tirth, Uttam, Volkan, Wraith, Yanky, Zheer

Sources: Baby names in England and Wales: 2017, Sarah drops out of top 100 baby names for first time in over a century

Popular baby names in England and Wales, 2014

According to data from the Office for National Statistics (ONS), the most popular baby names in England and Wales last year were Amelia and Oliver.

Here are the top 10 girl names and top 10 boy names of 2014:

Girl NamesBoy Names
1. Amelia, 5,327 baby girls
2. Olivia, 4,724
3. Isla, 4,012
4. Emily, 3,991
5. Poppy, 3,273
6. Ava, 3,171
7. Isabella, 3,022
8. Jessica, 2,995
9. Lily, 2,965
10. Sophie, 2,905
1. Oliver, 6,649 baby boys
2. Jack, 5,804
3. Harry, 5,379
4. Jacob, 5,050
5. Charlie, 4,642
6. Thomas, 4,405
7. George, 4,320
8. Oscar, 4,269
9. James, 4,167
10. William, 4,134

In the girls’ top 10, Lily replaced Mia (now 13th).

The boys’ top 10 includes the same names in a different order.

The ONS report also highlighted a few seasonal favorites, such as…

  • Holly, which ranked 5th in December but 70th in June. Overall, it was 39th.
  • Summer, which ranked 25th in June but 105th in December. Overall, it was 58th.

Here are some of last year’s rare baby names, each given to either 3, 4 or 5 babies:

Rare Girl NamesRare Boy Names
Ambreen, Angharad, Arinola, Arzoo, Astala, Boux, Cagla, Cliodhna, Darasimi, Delyth, Dolsie, Elliw, Eslem, Flourish, Harper-Lee, Heulwen, Heyabel, Honeysuckle, Ilinca, Io, Iris-Rose, Jedidiah, Kitty-Rose, Lili-Haf, Loveday, Luul, L’Wren, Makatendeka, Maxima, Moksha, Morsal, Nainsi, Peach, Poppy-Willow, Ritaj, Sailor, Shailene, Tavleen, Topsy, Tuppence, Uxia, Vaneeza, Venba, Zennor, ZiggyAldion, Alias, Archimedes, Bevon, Boycie, Bright, Buzz, Caelum, Calix, Cloud, Coast, Cove, Crispin, Denley, Diesel, Dipson, Grantas, Gwern, Hanzala, Harrington, Jensen-James, Jolyon, Jonjoe, Jorel, Kebba, Keita, Khattab, Klaidas, Marceau, Metodi, Oaklen, Osazee, Peregrine, Refoel, Re’Kai, Romarni, Sanchez, Seweryn, Sheriff, Stanleigh, Swayley, Timurs, Ugnius, Vasco, Velizar, Ynyr

Finally, here are all of my previous posts on baby names in England and Wales: 2013, 2012, 2011, 2010, 2009, and 2008.

Source: Baby Names, England and Wales, 2014 – ONS

Popular baby names in the Czech Republic, 2014

According to data from the Ministry of the Interior of the Czech Republic, the most popular baby names in the country in 2014 were Eliška and Jakub.

Here are the Czech Republic’s top 10 girl names and top 10 boy names of 2014:

Girl Names Boy Names
1. Eliška, 2,332 baby girls
2. Tereza, 1,900
3. Anna, 1,708
4. Adéla, 1,535
5. Natálie, 1,386
6. Sofie, 1,180
7. Kristýna, 1,164
8. Karolína, 1,140
9. Viktorie, 1,086
10. Barbora, 1,078
1. Jakub, 2,902 baby boys
2. Jan, 2,659
3. Tomáš, 2,033
4. Adam, 1,861
5. Matyáš, 1,660
6. Filip, 1,601
7. Vojtěch, 1,591
8. Ondřej, 1,552
9. David, 1,526
10. Lukáš, 1,493

Here are some of the names bestowed only one time last year (genders mixed): Amapola, Airila Luna, Arizona, Arlindi, Atella, Cveta, Dezider, Edett Denny, Eloy Buffalo, Enerona, Felixa, Fljorim, Gaffar, George Albert London, Heliodor Jan, Kleopatra, Kordula, Latoya, Loveday, Lumi, Manu, Marco Willebrordus, Mariola, Mladen, Nellie Ellen, Neuvedeno, Renagi, Sini Merilla, Skrollan, Spartakus, Taavetti Sage, Tarquino, Thoriq, Vandula, Velen, Wyatt, Ylvie, Zaki Jones.

Source: ŽEBŘÍČEK: Toto jsou nejoblíbenější jména dětí v Česku za rok 2014

Popular baby names in Northern Ireland, 2014

According to data from the Northern Ireland Statistics and Research Agency (NISRA), the most popular baby names in Northern Ireland in 2014 were Emily and Jack.

Here are NI’s top 10 girl names and top 10 boy names of 2014:

Girl NamesBoy Names
1. Emily, 261 baby girls
2. Grace, 189
3. Sophie, 180
4. Amelia, 175
5. Ella, 172
6. Olivia, 152
7. Anna, 150
8. Lucy, 149
9. Sophia, 148
10. Eva, 146
1. Jack, 285 baby boys
2. James, 276
3. Daniel, 236
4. Charlie, 224
5. Harry, 193
6. Noah, 190
7. Oliver, 155
8. Ethan, 153
9. Jacob, 148
10. Thomas, 147

Olivia and Eva replaced Aoife and Jessica in the girls’ top 10.

Thomas replaced Matthew in the boys’ top 10.

Two names that made big jumps into the top 100 were Kian (171st to 78th) and Aria (218th to 89th).

Finally, here are some of the unusual names that were given to only 1 or 2 babies in Northern Ireland last year:

Girl NamesBoy Names
Aoifrie, Cobhlaith, Cuisle, Deirbhile, Enfys, Ermioni, Ezraelle, Flossie-Bo, Ionagh, Ionela, Labhaoise, Loveday, Maoiliosa, Maureen-Nevaeh, Narbflaith, Rimgaile, Saorfhlaith, Saylor-Doll, Tsz, Vogue, ZiniferAodh, Benji-Beau, Caoilte, Cavani, Connlaoth, Davog, Dualta, Epaphroditus, Feidhlim, Goldberg, Grantas, Jecstonio, Jeef, Kal-El, Laochra, Laoghaire, Mjtba, Peanut, Seachlann, Stanex, Theo-Thaddeus, Tucgan

Here are the rankings for Northern Ireland for 2013.

Sources: NISRA – Demography, Most popular NI baby names for 2014 are Jack and Emily