How popular is the baby name Liv in the United States right now? How popular was it historically? Find out using the graph below! Plus, see baby names similar to Liv and check out all the blog posts that mention the name Liv.

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Popularity of the Baby Name Liv

Number of Babies Named Liv

Born in the U.S. Since 1880

Posts that Mention the Name Liv

Name Quotes for the Weekend #34

Kareem Abdul-Jabbar quote

From the essay Why I converted to Islam by Kareem Abdul-Jabbar, born Ferdinand Lewis “Lew” Alcindor:

The transition from Lew to Kareem was not merely a change in celebrity brand name — like Sean Combs to Puff Daddy to Diddy to P. Diddy — but a transformation of heart, mind and soul. I used to be Lew Alcindor, the pale reflection of what white America expected of me. Now I’m Kareem Abdul-Jabbar, the manifestation of my African history, culture and beliefs.

[…]

The adoption of a new name was an extension of my rejection of all things in my life that related to the enslavement of my family and people. Alcindor was a French planter in the West Indies who owned my ancestors. My forebears were Yoruba people, from present day Nigeria. Keeping the name of my family’s slave master seemed somehow to dishonor them. His name felt like a branded scar of shame.

[…]

Some fans still call me Lew, then seem annoyed when I ignore them. They don’t understand that their lack of respect for my spiritual choice is insulting. It’s as if they see me as a toy action figure, existing solely to decorate their world as they see fit, rather than as an individual with his own life.

From an article about hipsters reviving long-lost English words:

Luu writes that words with “a nostalgic air, reflecting the cultural values and tastes of the speaker,” are suddenly popping up everywhere. These include: bespoke, peruse, dapper, mayhaps and bedchamber. You’ll also find that old-timey prepositions like amidst and amongst are back. The same goes for baby names that were long considered lost to the past, such as Silas and Adeline.

From a Graham Norton Show episode [vid] that aired in October, 2014, in which comedian Stephen Fry gives actor Robert Downey, Jr., a baby name suggestion:

Could you, just as a favor, cause I know that, you know, some stars like to give unusual names, could you call him or her Uppy? Uppy Downey?

Spoiler #1: Downey and his wife Susan welcomed a baby girl that November. But they didn’t name her “Uppy.” Her full name is Avri Roel Downey.

From Queer Mama for Autostraddle Episode Seven — Help Name Our Baby (thank you to the anonymous reader who sent me this link!):

When Simone and I were first considering names, we thought we should err towards the gender neutral side of the girl-name spectrum. We know a good number of masculine-identifying women and so many trans men who haven’t liked their more feminine given names. But that’s the problem with “gender neutral.” It mostly has just come to mean sort-of masculine. Lover of femininity that I am, was I really willing to write off all the beautiful feminine names because our kid might not be femme?

We decided no, we wouldn’t do that. Our kid can change her name if and when she wants, and in the meantime, we will call her a name we love, even if that’s feminine! In any case, I have friends who’ve later changed their names not because of gender at all, but just because they wanted to be called something else, so there really are no guarantees.

Spoiler #2: Haley and Simone’s baby girl was born in late August. Her full name is Juniper Everhart Jude [vid].

From an article about a 21-year-old Ariel (pronounced “are-e-elle,” not “air-e-elle” like the Disney mermaid):

“I mean, it’s annoying when people say ‘Ariel’ because that’s not my name,” Malloy said. “But it’s great because they’ll be like, ‘Oh my gosh, you’re a princess,’ and I’m like, ‘You’re right.'”

From an article about Irish TV personality Vogue Williams:

“Everyone thinks I made up my name or I changed it at some stage and I’m actually called Joanne. But I like having a different name. Brian and I squabble all the time over baby names – because I want to give any children we have an equally mad name as the one I was given.

“Our friends in Australia had a baby girl about four years ago when we were living there and they called her Sailor. Now Liv Tyler has had a boy and she’s named him Sailor. So that’s top of the list at the moment.”

Finally, two of the comments on Haleema Shah’s post What’s in a Name? Reflections on Who We are and What We are Called.

First one is from Lesley Woodward:

I was born in 1937 to an American mother and a naturalized German father. I was named “Gretchen” which was a mistake since war with Germany was looming and there was a lot of anti-German sentiment. Anything German was stigmatized, even innocent little daschund dogs were kicked and hated for their German origin. I was referred to as “the little Nazi” in the neighborhood and school because of my name and my father’s heavily accented English. We moved when I was about 12 years old, and I took the opportunity to change my name, dropping “Gretchen” and insisting on being called by my middle name “Lesley.” My parents knew nothing of this, and were confused when the neighborhood children came to the door and asked for “Lesley.” It took a lot of self control not to respond to “Gretchen” or even acknowledge the someone had spoken to me, but gradually I morphed into “Lesley” and have since legally dropped my birth name.

Second one is from Lloret de Mar Pelayo:

I cringe when people ask me my name. In Spanish it sounds beautiful, even in it’s native Catalan accent, but in English it sounds dreadful.

Lloret De Mar is a city north of Barcelona, a beach town. The double L can be pronounced like a Y or a J. But in English everyone and I mean everyone sounds out the double L like the L in laughter. I feel terrible correcting people because they immediately question whether I spelled my own name wrong (“You know there’s two Ls right?”) And I politely smile and have to further explain…

My father is Catalan and he and my mother (who is Puerto Rican) wanted a name that reflected Catalan ancestry and therefore Lloret was what they picked. I absolutely love the history of the name and its ties to Catalan culture…I just wish they had spelled it with a Y or a J so it’d be easier to pronounce in English!

Here’s the Wikipedia page for Lloret de Mar, which is on the Mediterranean coast.

And here’s a link to the names quotes category, if you’d like to see past posts like this one.


Popular Baby Names in Denmark, 2014

According to data from Statistics Denmark, the most popular baby names in the country in 2014 were Emma and William.

Here are Denmark’s top 10 girl names and top 10 boy names of 2014:

Girl Names Boy Names
1. Emma
2. Sofia
3. Ida
4. Freja
5. Clara
6. Laura
7. Anna
8. Ella
9. Isabella
10. Karla
1. William
2. Noah
3. Lucas
4. Oscar
5. Victor
6. Malthe
7. Emil
8. Frederik
9. Oliver
10. Magnus

New to the girls’ top 10 are Ella and Karla, which replace Sofie and Josefine.

New to the boys’ top 10 is Malthe, which replaces Alexander.

Malthe jumped from 22nd place in 2013 to 6th last year likely because of a 14-year-old contestant on Denmark’s Voice Junior named Malthe. (He has brothers named Asbjørn and Halfdan, btw.)

The boy names Nohr, Sander, Asger and the girl names Signe, Liv, Alba, Aya all entered the top 50 in 2014.

Sources: Names of newborn children, Denmark’s top baby names revealed

How Do You Like Your Name, Olivia?

“Olivia is a beautiful, classic name and I’m lucky to bear it,” says Olivia, a 20-year-old from Australia who blogs at Naming The Fishes.

How did she come to have the name Olivia?

It was the only name my parents could decide on, that they loved. Though I think part of the reason why my Dad agreed to it was because he adores Olivia Newton John. Plus they loved the nickname Livie.

What does she like most about her name?

I love how it rolls off the tongue, that it won’t date because it is a classical name. I also love it was the name of a character in one of Shakespeare’s plays because I’m such a literary junkie. And then there is the nickname Liv.

And what does she like least about her name?

The nickname Ollie and that some people still misspell it even though its quite popular now.

Despite this popularity, she would still recommend the name Olivia to parents today: “Sure. Why not? I know its quite a popular name now but its popular for a reason.”

Thanks, Olivia!

[Would you like to tell me about your name?]

Baby Name Needed – Middle Name Suggestions

A reader named Rachel is having her first baby and needs a few middle name suggestions.

She and her husband have narrowed the first names down to Evie, Vivienne or Kiki for a girl and Milo or Max for a boy. The surname will start with an L, and end with a Y, and contain 2 syllables (with a stress on the first).

Rachel also mentions that, while she loves the name Kiki, the combination of Kiki and her surname

sounds like some kind of spicy food, “a portion of Kiki Lxxxxy please!”

Kiki is definitely an interesting pick. :) I have to admit, I don’t see it come up as a first name choice very often…especially next to a name like Vivienne.

Here are some ideas I came up with for middles:

Evie Vivienne Kiki Milo Max
Abigail
Beatrix
Caroline
Felice
Kate
Leah
Grace
Rose
Ava
Avery
Bree
Cleo
Harper
Liv
Lola
Tessa
Amelia
Anna
Elizabeth
Elodie
Fiona
Helene
Jane
Julienne
Benjamin
Emmett
Finn
Henry
Jude
Julian
Solomon
Sylvester
Alexander
Dominic
Everett
Isaac
Jasper
Leo
Oliver
Theo

Do you think any of the above work especially well?

What other middle names would you suggest to Rachel?

One-Syllable Girl Names – Bree, Hope, Jill, Paige, Tess

Want a baby name that’s short & sweet? Here are over 100 one-syllable girl names:

Anne, Ann
Ayn
Bea
Belle
Bess
Beth
Bjork
Blair, Blaire
Blake, Blayke
Blanche
Bliss
Blythe
Bree, Brie
Britt
Brooke, Brook
Brynn, Bryn, Brynne
Cass
Cate
Claire, Clare, Clair
Dawn
Dee
Dream
Drew, Dru
Elle
Eve
Faith, Fayth
Fawn
Faye, Fay, Fae
Fern
Fleur
Flor
Fran
Gail, Gayle, Gale
Grace, Grayce
Greer
Gwen
Gwyn
Hope
Jade, Jayde, Jaide
Jan
Jane, Jayne
Jean, Jeanne
Jen, Jenn
Jess
Jill
Joan
Joy, Joi, Joie
Joyce
Jude
June
Kai
Kate
Kay, Kaye
Kim
Klaire
Kris
Laine, Lane, Layne
Lark
Leigh, Lee
Liv
Liz
Love
Lux
Luz
Lynn, Lynne, Lyn
Mae, May
Madge
Maeve
Mai
Marge
Maude, Maud
Nelle, Nell
Neve, Niamh
Noor, Nour
Paige, Payge
Pam
Pearl
Queen
Quinn
Rae
Reece, Reese
Rayne, Rain, Raine
Reem
Rose
Rue
Ruth
Sage, Saige
Scout
Shea, Shae, Shay
Skye, Sky
Sloane, Sloan
Sol
Star, Starr
Sue
Tea
Tess
Trish
True, Tru
Wren

See any you like?

P.S. Here are the most popular 1-syllable girl names of 2012, 2011 and 2010.