How popular is the baby name Ian in the United States right now? How popular was it historically? Find out using the graph below! Plus, check out all the blog posts that mention the name Ian.

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Popularity of the Baby Name Ian


Posts that Mention the Name Ian

Popular baby names in Ecuador, 2020

ecuador

According to the Ecuadorian Institute of Statistics and Censuses (INEC), the most popular baby names in the country in 2020 were Mia and Liam.

Here are Ecuador’s top 10 girl names and top 10 boy names of 2020:

Girl Names

  1. Mia, 2,262 baby girls
  2. Danna, 1,785
  3. Maria, 1,765
  4. Sofia, 1,637
  5. Emma, 1,245
  6. Emily, 1,179
  7. Victoria, 1,167
  8. Lia, 1,157
  9. Aitana, 1,122
  10. Isabella, 932

Boy Names

  1. Liam, 2,877 baby boys
  2. Thiago, 2,378
  3. Dylan, 1,963
  4. Jose, 1,675
  5. Ian, 1,586
  6. Carlos, 1,495
  7. Juan, 1,421
  8. Luis, 1,411
  9. Gael, 1,337
  10. Angel, 1,283

I’ve never posted rankings for Ecuador before, but the data indicates that the top names in 2019 were also Mia and Liam.

Sources: Nombres y Apellidos del Ecuador – INEC, Los nombres de bebés que fueron tendencia en Ecuador el 2020

Popular baby names in Peru, 2020

Peru

According to Peru’s National Registry of Identification and Civil Status (RENIEC), the most popular baby names in the country last year were Mia and Liam.

Peru released a single set of rankings that combined both genders, so here are Peru’s top 20 baby names overall for 2020:

  1. Liam, 4,179 babies
  2. Thiago, 3,398
  3. Dylan, 3,150
  4. Mia, 2,510
  5. Gael, 2,484
  6. Camila, 1,929
  7. Alessia, 1,856
  8. Luciana, 1,838
  9. Mateo, 1,837
  10. Zoe, 1,530
  11. Ian, 1,458
  12. Luis, 1,374
  13. Valentina, 1,335
  14. Aitana, 1,298
  15. Danna, 1,295
  16. Lucas, 1,248 (tie)
  17. Santiago, 1,248 (tie)
  18. Luana, 1,239
  19. Juan, 1,228
  20. Ariana, 1,213

I haven’t been able to track down Peru’s rankings for 2019, but in 2018 the top two names were the same.

RENIEC regularly tweets about Peru’s unusual baby names, so I can also tell you that, within the last few years, the country has welcomed babies named…

  • Lapadula (15 babies) + Gianluca Lapadula (4)
  • Peter Parker (5) + Spiderman (1)
  • Gareca (3)
    • after former Argentine soccer player Ricardo Gareca, who now manages Peru’s national team
  • Mark Zuckerberg (2)
  • Bo-derek (1) + Boderek (1)
  • Bad Bunny
  • Beethovena
  • Gremlins
  • Kardasham
  • Neilamstrong
  • Netflix
  • Philcollins
  • Pringles
  • Rafael Nadal

Finally, Peru has put together several cool online booklets (PDFs) highlighting the names and naming practices of various indigenous groups within the country, so here’s a sampling of names from each of the booklets…

  • Aimara names:
    • Amuyiri, “thinker”
    • Iqilla, “flower”
    • Phuyo, “bird feather”
    • Qhispi, “quartz, rock crystal, transparent object, mirror”
    • Thalutari, “calming, lulling”
  • Asháninkas names:
    • Chabaka, species of toucan
    • Kamore, “galaxy, milky way”
    • Manchori, “herbalist”
    • Sabaro, species of parrot
    • Yonamine, “act of looking at you”
  • Awajún names:
    • Esámat, “heal the wound”
    • Nanchíjam, “little bird that eats rice”
    • Púmpuk, owl species
    • Tíi, “hard as stone” (implies stoicism)
    • Úum, “blowgun”
  • Jaqaru names:
    • Kukiri, “pigeon, dove”
    • Nup’i, “the heat that is received from the sun’s rays”
    • Pajshi, “moon”
    • Qajsiri, “waterfall”
    • Waraja, “star”
  • Matsés names:
    • Badi
    • Chidopiu
    • Didu
    • Mëbu
    • Tamu
  • Quechua names:
    • Liwyaq, “lightning”
    • Qullqi, gold or silver metal
    • Waqra, “horn”
    • Willka, “sun”
    • Yaku, “water”
  • Shipibo-Konibo names:
    • Biri, “dazzling”
    • Kesin, “strip; fine and transparent banana fiber”
    • Panshin, “yellow”
    • Xeka, “vanilla”
    • Wasan, “puffin”
  • Wampís names:
    • Apaape, “elusive”
    • Chunchumanch, “snail”
    • Dekentai, “bruise” (implies strength)
    • Mamainkur, “yucca flower”
    • Pamau, “tapir”

Sources:

Where did the baby name Sossity come from in 1972?

Jethro Tull's album "Benefit" (1970)
Jethro Tull album

While researching -ity names (like Felicity and Serenity) at one point, I happened upon the odd name Sossity, which was in the U.S. baby name data a total of twice, both times in the 1970s:

  • 1977: unlisted
  • 1976: 7 baby girls named Sossity
  • 1975: unlisted
  • 1974: unlisted
  • 1973: unlisted
  • 1972: 5 baby girls named Sossity [debut]
  • 1971: unlisted
  • 1970: unlisted

Where did it come from?

The Jethro Tull song “Sossity: You’re a Woman,” which was the last track on their third album, Benefit (1970).

As made clear by the lyrics, the fictitious female Sossity is meant to be symbolic of society at large:

Sossity: You’re a woman.
Society: You’re a woman.

According to Jethro Tull singer Ian Anderson, the song “obviously [was] written as a double-meaning where I’m notionally talking about an imaginary girl in frankly a rather thin and embarrassing pun.” He also said the song was “kind of okay musically…but lyrically I was never really comfortable with it. And it’s mainly that one word, Sossity, an invented word that seemed like a rather prissy girl’s name.”

So how did the British band come to be named after a 18th-century British agriculturist/inventor?

In the late ’60s, when the group was playing small clubs, they changed their name frequently. “Jethro Tull” was a name they tried in February of 1968 at the suggestion of a booking agent, and that’s the one that stuck.

Ian has said that he since regrets choosing that name, specifically disliking the fact that it came from a real historical person: “I can’t help but feel more and more as I get older that I’m guilty of identity theft and I ought to go to prison for it, really.”

(Jethro Tull’s next and more successful album, Aqualung, featured a song about a character named Aqualung. I’m happy to report that “Aqualung” has never popped up in the SSA data.)

Sources:

Popular baby names in Puerto Rico, 2021

Puerto Rico

According to the U.S. Social Security Administration, the most popular baby names in Puerto Rico last year were Valentina and Liam.

Here are Puerto Rico’s top 10 girl names and top 10 boy names of 2021:

Girl Names

  1. Valentina, 197 baby girls
  2. Emma, 153
  3. Victoria, 128
  4. Amaia, 116
  5. Luna, 114
  6. Isabella, 102
  7. Gianna, 93
  8. Mia, 90
  9. Catalina, 88
  10. Milena, 87

Boy Names

  1. Liam, 260 baby boys
  2. Thiago, 200
  3. Sebastian, 196
  4. Noah, 180
  5. Dylan, 165
  6. Mateo, 164
  7. Lucas, 161
  8. Adrian, 140
  9. Ian, 131
  10. Jayden, 116

In the girls’ top 10, Milena replaced Kamila.

In the boys’ top 10, Adrian replaced Matias.

In 2020, the top names in Puerto Rico were also Valentina and Liam.

And the most popular baby names in all other U.S. territories — American Samoa, Guam, U.S. Virgin Islands, and Northern Mariana Islands (combined) — in 2021 were Isla/Olivia (tie) and Ethan.

Source: Popular Names by Territory

Top one-syllable baby names of 2021: Grace, Claire; James, Jack

single tree

Which one-syllable baby names were the most popular in the U.S. in 2020?

I scanned the 2021 U.S. baby name data and found these:

Girl Names

  1. Grace (ranked 34th overall)
  2. Claire (59th)
  3. Quinn (80th)
  4. Jade (91st)
  5. Rose (116th)
  6. Maeve (124th)
  7. Sloane (143rd)
  8. Reese (147th)
  9. Faith (169th)
  10. June (175th)

(A little lower down were Sage, Ruth, and Blake.)

Boy Names

  1. James (ranked 5th overall)
  2. Jack (11th)
  3. John (27th)
  4. Luke (32nd)
  5. Kai (71st)
  6. Brooks (77th)
  7. Beau (94th)
  8. Jace (102nd)
  9. Chase (125th)
  10. Cole (132nd)

(A little lower down were George, Rhett, and Jude.)

These lists include the same names that appeared on the 2020 lists, but in both cases the names are in a slightly different order.

And, of course, here’s the usual disclaimer: I left out the borderline boy names (Owen, Wyatt, Charles, Miles/Myles, Ryan, Ian, Rowan, Gael) that can be pronounced with either one or two syllables, depending upon the accent of the speaker. Notably, all nine of these names ranked higher than both Chase and Cole.

For more single-syllable names, check out the one-syllable girl names and one-syllable boy names posts.