How popular is the baby name Jordache in the United States right now? How popular was it historically? Find out using the graph below! Plus, check out all the blog posts that mention the name Jordache.

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Popularity of the Baby Name Jordache


Posts that Mention the Name Jordache

Where did the baby name Brittania come from?

Brittania advertisement

In 1979 and 1980, four very similar names — Brittania, Brittanya, Britania and Britanya — all popped up in the U.S. baby name data:

BrittaniaBrittanyaBritaniaBritanya
198313 baby girls...
198213 baby girls6 baby girls..
198135 baby girls 7 baby girls9 baby girls10 baby girls
198060 baby girls [peak]19 baby girls [debut]13 baby girls [debut]16 baby girls [debut]
19795 baby girls [debut]...
1978....
1977....

What put them there?

A marketing campaign for Brittania blue jeans.

Sportswear brand Brittania (pronounced brih-TAN-yah) was launched in Seattle in 1973 by businessman Walter Schoenfeld.

He was inspired to start selling “washed” blue jeans to Americans after spotting “a pair of faded blue denim slacks in the window of a London shop.” (Brittania jeans were “fashionable alternatives to the dark denim Levi’s that were so prevalent at that time.”)

Sales of Britannia jeans increased throughout the 1970s:

In less than 10 years, Brittania Sportswear was selling 30 million pairs a year and Brittania — Schoenfeld spelled it that way to distinguish his brand from the Royal Yacht Britannia — had a team of 40 to 50 designers and about 400 employees in Seattle.

Then, in 1980, Schoenfeld made a “decision which ran against his better judgment: Brittania embarked on the first full-scale advertising campaign in its history.”

Brittania advertisement, 1981
“My home is Texas but I live in Brittania!”

That year, the company spend about $9 million on advertising. The result was the “My home is __ but I live in Brittania” marketing campaign.

The campaign was very successful; brand recognition increased from 48% in 1978 to 96% in 1980.

But it also created a new problem: too much demand for the product. By the spring of 1980, the company “had a 50 percent increase in orders over the previous year, but lacked production capacity to fill them.”

This situation, along with several other issues, led the company to file for bankruptcy protection in 1983. Several years after that, it was purchased by Levi Strauss.

Brittania advertisement

Brittania may not be around anymore, but, as the very first designer jeans company in the U.S., it paved the way for brands like Jordache, Murjani, and Chardon.

It also helped kick the baby name Brittany into high gear circa 1980:

popularity graph for the baby name Brittany
  • 1983: 4,377 baby girls named Brittany [64th]
  • 1982: 3,102 baby girls named Brittany [94th]
  • 1981: 1,714 baby girls named Brittany [165th]
  • 1980: 1,406 baby girls named Brittany [190th]
  • 1979: 792 baby girls named Brittany [300th]
  • 1978: 630 baby girls named Brittany [345th]
  • 1977: 488 baby girls named Brittany [419th]

What are your thoughts on the baby name Brittania? (Do you like it more or less than Brittany?)

Sources:

P.S. Did you know that Seattle’s apparel industry was born in the wake of the Klondike gold rush? Many prospectors bought provisions in Seattle before heading north to Alaska. Apparel companies founded in Seattle include Filson (1897), Nordstrom (1901), and Eddie Bauer (1920).

Dymaxion: Possible Baby Name?

Buckminster Fuller was a prolific designer and inventor (among other things). The word he used over and over again to name his creations? Dymaxion.

dymaxion

Fuller’s Dymaxion innovations included:

  • The Dymaxion House (affordable, transportable, maintenance-free)
  • The Dymaxion Car (3 wheels, 11 seats, teardrop-shaped)
  • The Dymaxion Map (which folded into an icosahedral globe)
  • Dymaxion Sleep (awake for 6 hours, sleep for 1/2 hour, repeat)

“Dymaxion,” pronounced die-MAK-see-uhn, is a portmanteau of the words dynamic, maximum, and tension (though some sources say the last element is simply the word ion).

The word reminds me of modern male names like Jaxion, Dymond, Maxin, and Xavion. And the fact that it was coined makes me think of brand names that became baby names such as Qiana and Jordache.

“Dymaxion” is an eye-catching word, it has retrofuturistic associations, and it handily shortens to Max…so do you think it might make a good baby name?

Image: Adapted from Dymaxion House (LOC)

Where did the baby name Chardon come from?

From a Chardon commercial, c. 1981

We’ve talked about Jordache, Murjani, even Wrangler…ready for yet another baby name inspired by designer jeans?

This one is Chardón, pronounced shar-DON — as if it were French. (The closest legit French word I could find, chardon, means “thistle.”)

“I beg your Chardón!” was the catchphrase used in the semi-suggestive commercials* that must have started airing circa 1981, as that’s when the baby name Chardon debuted on the SSA’s list:

  • 1983: 5 baby girls named Chardon
  • 1982: unlisted
  • 1981: 15 baby girls named Chardon [debut]
  • 1980: unlisted
  • 1979: unlisted

But the brand didn’t last long, and neither did the name, which made the list just once more before dropping off for good.

*Here’s one of those commercials:

What do you think of the baby name Chardon?

Wrangler, the ’80s Baby Name Enigma!

The baby name Wrangler debuted on the U.S. baby name charts in 1987.

So here’s the mystery: What caused the debut? Was the name inspired by Wrangler Jeans, or by the Jeep Wrangler? Or both?

The '80s Baby Name Wrangler - Was it inspired by the jeans or the jeep?

Wrangler Jeans, which have been around since the 1940s, were available in trendy, tight-fitting “designer” styles during the ’80s (just like Jordache and Murjani). Wrangler commercials from that time period (e.g., 1, 2, 3) all featured the same catchy “live it to the limit in Wrangler” theme song.

The Jeep Wrangler was introduced in 1986. The Jeep Wrangler ads weren’t as eye-catching as the Wrangler Jeans ads, but it’s hard to overlook the correlation between the year the car came out and the year the name debuted, and the fact that new cars with decent names often do inspire baby name debuts (e.g., Chevelle, Allante, Miata).

My opinion? I think both products had some influence here.

A small number babies born prior to 1987 were named Wrangler, and I’m sure a few of them were named with the Jeans in mind. (Favorite example: James Levi Wrangler Dunlap, born in 1984.)

But I think the Jeep Wrangler is what gave the name enough of a boost in 1987 for us to see it on the baby charts.

What do you think?

(Interestingly, the baby name Wrangler was only on the SSA’s list once in the ’80s and a few more times during the ’90s, but it has appeared consistently on the charts since the turn of the century. Its best showing so far was in 2011, with 16 baby boys named Wrangler that year.)

Sources:

Where did the baby name Murjani come from?

Murjani commercial
“Gloria Vanderbilt by Murjani” commercial (w/ Debbie Harry of Blondie)

In 1930, a man named B. K. Murjani left India to start a clothing company in China.

The Murjani company was focused on manufacturing until the mid-1960s, when B.K.’s son Mohan joined and transitioned the company to designer brand development and marketing.

In 1977, Murjani teamed up with heiress Gloria Vanderbilt to launch one of the first designer jean brands, Gloria Vanderbilt.

The company poured a lot of money into building the brand. According to the Murjani Group website, Gloria Vanderbilt “was perhaps the first apparel brand to be advertised in marketing channels such as buses, phone booths and TV.” Gloria herself was featured in many of the television commercials.

By 1979, sales of GV jeans were massive.

In 1980, the company started using younger celebrities to endorse the brand. They put out print ads featuring baseball player Reggie Jackson and TV commercials featuring Blondie singer Debbie Harry.

We’ve already seen that advertisements (and especially TV commercials) have the power to influence baby name trends (e.g., Calizza, Dijonnaise), so it’s not surprising that 1980 is also the year the baby name Murjani debuted on the SSA’s baby name list:

  • 1983: unlisted
  • 1982: 6 baby girls named Murjani
  • 1981: 10 baby girls named Murjani
  • 1980: 8 baby girls named Murjani [debut]
  • 1979: unlisted

Like Jordache, though, Murjani dropped off the list after only a few years.

I don’t know what the etymology of the surname Murjani is, but Mohan Murjani has been quoted as saying that he has “sometimes mistaken as an Italian because of [his] family name.”

Sources:

  • Duttagupta, Ishani. “Indian style guru: Building global lifestyle brands.” Economic Times 15 May 2008.
  • Hellman, Peter. “Sic Transit Gloria.” New York Magazine 15 Feb. 1993: 34-41.
  • Murjani Group