How popular is the baby name Lisbon in the United States right now? How popular was it historically? Find out using the graph below! Plus, check out all the blog posts that mention the name Lisbon.

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Popularity of the Baby Name Lisbon


Posts that Mention the Name Lisbon

Baby names in the news: Lisbon, Luka, Azzurra

Some recent (and not-so-recent) baby names from the news…

Allayna: A baby girl born in Utah in August of 2021 was given the middle name Allayna after the neighbor (and nursing student) who helped deliver her. (Fox 13)

Azzurra: A baby girl born to a Scots-Italian family in Scotland on July 11, 2021 — the day the Italian national football team (nicknamed gli Azzurri, “the blues”) won the Euro 2020 Championship — was named Azzurra. (Daily Record)

Heights: The baby boy born to movie director Jon M. Chu in July of 2019 was named Jonathan Heights — middle name in honor of Chu’s film In The Heights, which he was shooting at that time. (MSN, via Abby)

Itty: A baby girl born in Miami to a father whose parents passed away in the Surfside condo collapse was named Itta, nickname “Itty,” after her late grandmother Itty. (Today, via Abby)

Lisbon: The baby boy born to British TV personality Dr. Zoe Williams and her partner in June of 2021 was named Lisbon because the couple “met by chance at a bar in Lisbon, Portugal.” (Hello)

Luka Modric: A baby boy born in Peru in July of 2018 — the day after Croatia beat England in the semi-finals of the 2018 World Cup — was named Luka Modric after Croatia’s captain, Luka Modric. (Croatia Week)

Popular and unique baby names in Iowa, 2016

I love that the Social Security Administration releases so much baby name data to the public. But I’ve always had mixed feelings about that 5-baby threshold for inclusion. (Due to privacy concerns, the government doesn’t release names given to fewer than 5 babies per gender, per year.)

Part of me appreciates the threshold. For instance, I like that it adds significance to the pop culture-inspired debut names I’m always posting about, as these names had to hit a certain minimum level of usage in order to register in the data.

But the other part of me? The other part just really, really wants to see those rare/crazy names at the bottom of the list.

So I get excited when I find U.S. data from an official source that does go down to single-instance usage. Up until recently, I only knew about Sonoma County and Los Angeles County, but recently I discovered that Iowa (an entire state!) also releases down-to-1 baby name data. Yay!

But before we get to the rare names, let’s look at the state of Iowa’s top baby names of 2016:

Girl Names
1. Olivia, 203 baby girls
2. Emma, 181
3. Charlotte, 158
4. Harper, 156
5. Ava & Evelyn, 148 each (2-way tie)
6. Amelia, 125
7. Nora, 123
8. Sophia, 112
9. Addison, 101
10. Grace, 96

Boy Names
1. Oliver, 197 baby boys
2. Owen, 178
3. William, 174
4. Wyatt, 170
5. Henry, 165
6. Liam, 159
7. Noah, 149
8. Benjamin, 148
9. Jackson, 144
10. Lincoln, 123

  • In the girls’ top 10, Addison and Grace replaced Avery.
  • In the boys’ top 10, Benjamin and Lincoln replaced Mason and Elijah.
  • In 2015, the top two names were Emma and Liam.

(The SSA rankings for Iowa are similar, but not exactly the same. One notable difference on is that the SSA ranks Grayson 10th on the boys list, and puts Lincoln down in 13th.)

And now for the rarities!

Iowa’s website offers interactive baby name usage graphs that include all names bestowed at least once from 2000 to 2016. Here’s a sampling of rare baby names in Iowa (2000-2016 usage):

Girl NamesBoy Names
Arabia (1)
Bishop (1)
Currency (1)
Dream (3)
Eros (1)
Fairy (1)
Gatsby (1)
Heritage (1)
Irish (5)
Jasper (1)
KeyEssence (1)
Lisbon (1)
Michigan (1)
Nirvana (3)
Orchid (1)
PairoDice (1)
Qy (1)
Reminisce (1)
Scully (1)
Tear (1)
Unity (4)
Veruca (1)
Windy (2)
Xanadu (1)
Yawh (1)
Zinnia (1)
Arcade (1)
Banksy (1)
Cactus (1)
Denali (2)
Elvis (18)
Fonzy (1)
Galaxy (1)
Helium (1)
Indigo (2)
Jeep (3)
Kal-El (3)
Lightning (1)
Mowgli (1)
Notorious (1)
Opttimus (1)
Player (1)
Quest (3)
Racer (3)
Sanctify (1)
Tavern (1)
Universe (1)
Vegas (1)
Winner (4)
Xyn (1)
Young-Sky (1)
Zealand (1)

If you decide to dig through the data, leave a comment and let me know what you spot!

And if you’re friends with any expectant parents in Iowa, tell those lucky ducks that they have access to full sets of baby name rankings for their state. Either send them a link to this post or to one of the pages below…

Sources: Top Baby Names – Iowa Department of Public Health, Baby Names Popularity Over Time – Iowa Department of Public Health

Update, 2020: The above links no longer work; here’s an updated link to the Iowa baby names.

Georgia family with 16 children

children

You guys seemed to like last week’s big family post, so I’ll try to write more posts like that one in the coming weeks.

Let’s start with the Ginn family of Georgia, circa 1931.

Bowman, Ga., July 14 (AP) – For family nomenclature Mr. and Mrs. John R. Ginn, who live near here, recommend the alphabetical system, especially for a family with 16 children.

Relative ages, they find, are easily called to mind and all element of error is practically eliminated in giving a complete enumeration.

Their children are named as follows: Brodie, Corbin, Dorcas, Elmira, Fezzan, Gregor, Hassie, Ithmar, Jessie, Kester, Lisbon, Manson, Nelson, Ornice, Pascal and Quaver.

In 1900, according to the Census, the Ginns had just one child. By 1910, they had 8. And in 1920, 14.

Which of the 16 names do you like best?

And, if you could complete the set — add 10 names, one that starts with A, the rest starting with R through Z — which names would you choose?

Source: “Alphabetical System Used to Name Children.” Reading Eagle 14 Jul. 1931: 7.