How popular is the baby name Marty in the United States right now? How popular was it historically? Find out using the graph below! Plus, check out all the blog posts that mention the name Marty.

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Popularity of the Baby Name Marty


Posts that Mention the Name Marty

Contrarian baby names: Cliff, Janet, Steve, Wanda…

corn

“Everly” is hot…”Beverly” is not. It’s a one-letter difference between fashionable and fusty.

If you’re sensitive to style, you’ll prefer Everly. It fits with today’s trends far better than Beverly does.

But if you’re someone who isn’t concerned about style, or prefers to go against style, then you may not automatically go for Everly. In fact, you may be more attracted to Beverly because it’s the choice that most modern parents would avoid.

If you’ve ever thought about intentionally giving your baby a dated name (like Debbie, Grover, Marcia, or Vernon) for the sake of uniqueness within his/her peer group — if you have no problem sacrificing style for distinctiveness — then this list is for you.

Years ago, the concept of “contrarian” baby names came up in the comments of a post about Lois. Ever since then, creating a collection of uncool/contrarian baby names has been on my to-do list.

Finally, last month, I experimented with various formulas for pulling unstylish baby names out of the SSA dataset. Keeping the great-grandparent rule in mind, I aimed for names that would have been fashionable among the grandparents of today’s babies. The names below are the best results I got.

Contrarian Baby Names: Girls

Alberta
Anita
Ann
Annetta
Annette
Bambi
Becky
Benita
Bertha
Bessie
Beth
Betty
Beverley
Beverly
Blanche
Bobbie
Bobby
Bonita
Candy
Caren
Carlene
Carol
Carole
Cary
Caryn
Cathleen
Cathy
Charla
Charlene
Charmaine
Cheri
Cherie
Cheryl
Chris
Christi
Cindy
Claudette
Coleen
Colleen
Connie
Dale
Danette
Danita
Darlene
Dawn
Dawna
Deanne
Debbie
Debora
Debra
Deirdre
Delores
Denice
Denise
Diane
Dianna
Dianne
Dollie
Dolores
Dona
Donna
Doreen
Dori
Doris
Dorthy
Eddie
Edwina
Ernestine
Ethel
Gail
Gayle
Gena
Geralyn
Germaine
Gilda
Glenda
Glenna
Harriett
Jackie
Janet
Janice
Janis
Jayne
Jean
Jeanette
Jeanie
Jeanine
Jeanne
Jeannette
Jeannie
Jeannine
Jeri
Jerri
Jerry
Jill
Jimmie
Jo
Joan
Joann
Joanne
Jodi
Jody
Joellen
Joni
Juanita
Judi
Judy
Juli
Kandi
Karin
Kathie
Kathy
Kay
Kaye
Kerrie
Kerry
Kim
Kimberley
Kitty
Kris
Kristi
Ladonna
Laureen
Lauretta
Laurie
Lavonne
Lee
Leesa
Lois
Lorene
Lori
Lorie
Lorinda
Lorna
Lorraine
Lorrie
Lou
Louann
Lu
Luann
Luanne
Lucretia
Lupe
Lyn
Lynda
Lynn
Lynne
Madonna
Marcia
Marcy
Margie
Mariann
Marianne
Marla
Marsha
Maryjo
Maureen
Meg
Melba
Melinda
Melva
Michele
Migdalia
Mitzi
Myrna
Nanette
Nelda
Nicki
Nita
Norma
Pamela
Patrice
Patsy
Patti
Patty
Pauline
Peggy
Pennie
Phyllis
Randy
Reba
Rene
Rhonda
Rita
Robbie
Robbin
Roberta
Robin
Rochelle
Ronda
Rosanne
Roseann
Roxane
Roxann
Sandy
Saundra
Sharon
Sheila
Shelia
Shelley
Shelly
Sheri
Sherri
Sherry
Sheryl
Shirley
Sondra
Sue
Susanne
Suzan
Suzanne
Tammie
Tammy
Tena
Teri
Terri
Terry
Thelma
Theresa
Therese
Tina
Tonia
Tonya
Tracey
Traci
Tracie
Tracy
Treva
Trina
Trudy
Velma
Verna
Vicki
Vickie
Vicky
Wanda
Wendy
Willie
Wilma
Yolanda
Yvonne

Contrarian Baby Names: Boys

Adolph
Al
Alford
Alphonso
Arne
Arnie
Arnold
Artie
Barry
Barton
Bennie
Bernard
Bernie
Bert
Bill
Billie
Bob
Bobbie
Brad
Bradford
Brent
Bret
Britt
Bud
Buddy
Burl
Burt
Butch
Carey
Carleton
Carlton
Carmen
Carroll
Cary
Cecil
Chester
Chuck
Clarence
Claude
Cletus
Cleveland
Cliff
Clifford
Clifton
Columbus
Curt
Curtiss
Dale
Dan
Dana
Dannie
Darrel
Darryl
Daryl
Dave
Davie
Del
Delbert
Dell
Delmer
Denny
Derwin
Dewey
Dirk
Don
Donnie
Donny
Doug
Douglass
Doyle
Duane
Dudley
Duwayne
Dwain
Dwaine
Dwane
Dwight
Earl
Earnest
Ed
Edsel
Elbert
Ernie
Farrell
Floyd
Fred
Freddie
Fredric
Gale
Garland
Garry
Garth
Gene
Geoffrey
Gerard
Gerry
Gilbert
Glen
Glenn
Greg
Gregg
Greggory
Grover
Guy
Hal
Haywood
Herbert
Herman
Homer
Horace
Howell
Hubert
Irwin
Jackie
Jame
Jeff
Jefferey
Jeffry
Jerald
Jerold
Jess
Jim
Jimmie
Jodie
Jody
Johnie
Johnnie
Karl
Kelly
Ken
Kenney
Kennith
Kent
Kermit
Kerry
Kim
Kirk
Kraig
Kurt
Laurence
Lawrance
Len
Lenard
Lennie
Les
Leslie
Lester
Lindell
Lindsay
Lindsey
Linwood
Lloyd
Lonnie
Lonny
Loren
Lorin
Lowell
Loyd
Lynn
Marion
Marty
Matt
Maxie
Mel
Merle
Merrill
Mickel
Mickey
Millard
Milton
Mitch
Mitchel
Monty
Neal
Ned
Nicky
Norbert
Norman
Norris
Orville
Perry
Pete
Phil
Ralph
Randal
Randel
Randell
Randolph
Rayford
Rick
Rickey
Rickie
Rob
Robby
Robin
Rock
Rodger
Rogers
Rojelio
Rolf
Ron
Roosevelt
Rudolfo
Rudolph
Rufus
Russ
Rusty
Sal
Sammie
Sandy
Sanford
Scot
Sherman
Sherwood
Skip
Stan
Stanford
Steve
Stevie
Stewart
Stuart
Sylvester
Tad
Ted
Terence
Thurman
Tim
Timmothy
Timmy
Tod
Todd
Tom
Tommie
Toney
Tracey
Tracy
Val
Vernell
Vernon
Waymon
Wendell
Wilbert
Wilbur
Wilford
Wilfred
Willard
Willis
Winfred
Woody

Interestingly, thirteen of the names above — Bobbie, Cary, Dale, Jackie, Jimmie, Jody, Kerry, Kim, Lynn, Robin, Sandy, Tracey, Tracy — managed to make both lists.

Now some questions for you…

Do you like any of these names? Would you be willing to use any of them on a modern-day baby? Why or why not?

Some single-state baby names: Ariza, Barbie, Cruzito…

It’s easy to figure out which baby names appeared on all (or most) of the state-specific baby name lists for 2017. But what about the rare names that only made one or two state lists?

A total of 1,324 names appeared on just one state list, and a total of 1,198 names appeared on two state lists. (I analyzed boy names and girl names separately, though, so several of these names did show up on extra lists as the other gender.)

Here’s a selection of the baby names that appeared on just one state list last year:

  • Neyland, 41 boys in Tennessee (out of 53 nation-wide)
  • Roel, 23 boys in Texas (out of 50 nation-wide)
  • Ariza, 22 girls in Arizona (out of 31 nation-wide)
  • Marty, 21 boys in Ohio (out of 66 boys, and 13 girls, nation-wide)
  • Venice, 20 girls and 5 boys in California (out of 44 and 12 nation-wide)
  • Kinnick, 19 boys in Iowa (out of 29 nation-wide)
  • Benuel, 17 boys in Pennsylvania (out of 26 nation-wide)
  • Barbie, 16 girls in Pennsylvania (out of 29 nation-wide)
  • Kainalu, 16 boys in Hawaii (out of 23 nation-wide)
  • Mahina, 16 girls in Hawaii (out of 22 nation-wide)
  • Taysom, 14 boys in Utah (out of 24 nation-wide)
  • Hatcher, 10 boys in Alaska (out of 40 nation-wide)
  • Talmage, 10 boys in Utah (out of 20 nation-wide)
  • Atlee, 8 boys in Ohio (out of 25 boys and 32 girls nation-wide)
  • Cruzito, 8 boys in New Mexico (out of 25 nation-wide)
  • Nizhoni, 8 girls in Arizona (out of 21 nation-wide)
  • California, 7 girls in California (out of 16 nation-wide)
  • Griffey, 7 boys in Washington state (out of 21 nation-wide)
  • Kodiak, 7 boys in California (out of 30 nation-wide)
  • Rainier, 7 boys in Washington state (out of 24 nation-wide)
  • Alabama, 5 girls in California (out of 16 nation-wide)
  • Boomer, 5 boys in Texas (out of 33 nation-wide)
  • Cleveland, 5 boys in Florida (out of 28 nation-wide)
  • Crockett, 5 boys in Texas (out of 10 nation-wide)
  • Ole, 5 boys in Minnesota (out of 21 nation-wide)

A lot of these have easy explanations (e.g., Neyland Stadium, Kinnick Stadium, Mount Rainier, Taysom Hill) or are logical in some other way (like “Ariza” in Arizona).

Two that I couldn’t figure out, though, were Marty in Ohio and Barbie in Pennsylvania. My assumption regarding Barbie is that it’s popular among the Amish. (Benuel too.) But I have no clue about Marty. Is it college sports…?

And here’s a selection of the baby names that showed up on two state lists in 2017:

  • Hyrum, 36 boys in Utah and 15 in Idaho (out of 88 nation-wide)
  • Ammon, 24 boys in Utah and 6 in Pennsylvania (out of 64 nation-wide)
  • Fannie, 18 in Pennsylvania and 6 in New York (out of 45 nation-wide)
  • Avenir, 11 boys in Washington state and 6 in California (out of 31 nation-wide)
  • Reverie, 8 girls in California and 5 in Illinois (out of 26 nation-wide)
  • Sunshine, 7 girls in Arizona and 7 in California (out of 55 nation-wide)

I was confused about Avenir a few years ago, but I’ve since found the answer: it’s the Russian form of the Biblical name Abner. Avenir has been popping up on West Coast state lists (WA, OR, CA) lately, which makes sense given the fact that several West Coast cities have relatively large Russian-American populations.

Have you had a chance to go over the state lists yet? If so, did you spot anything interesting?

Name quotes #50: Rocket, Lenore, Heloise

Clueless character Cher on the similarity between her name and that of her best friend Dionne:

We were both named after great singers of the past who now do infomercials.

(Dionne’s name comes from Dionne Warwick.)

From a 2007 interview in People with film director Robert Rodriguez (whose kids are named Rocket, Racer, Rebel, Rogue, and Rhiannon):

Asked about his children’s unusual names, Robert attributes them to side effects he sustained from his college years when he subjected himself to medical tests to make extra money.

“Rocket is the first one. And once you name your first kid Rocket, you can’t name your next kid Marty. Racer, Rebel, Rogue…I’m just gonna blame this on the medical experiments. But they do have regular middle names in case they don’t want to start their own wrestling team.”

(An Australian celebrity named Lara Bingle has two sons named Rocket and Racer…perhaps in homage to Robert Rodriguez?)

From Incomplete birth certificates create a bureaucratic morass by Andrew Ryan in the Boston Globe:

A generation ago — when more families had six or more children — babies without official first names were surprisingly common. Overwhelmed new parents would leave the hospital without completing birth certificate paperwork.

But what once seemed like a quaint oddity becomes a serious inconvenience in a world of identity theft and terrorism. Today, governments demand birth certificates.

As more Baby Boomers reach retirement age, vital statistics offices — including at Boston City Hall — continue to receive a trickle of people whose birth certificates carry no first name. Boston officials estimated that in the 1950s, roughly 1 of every 25 birth certificates lacked a first name.

From the 1970 obituary of actress Lenore Ulric in the New York Times:

Born in the little town of New Ulm, Minn., in 1892, the daughter of Franz Xavier Ulrich, an Army hospital steward, Miss Ulric (she dropped the H from her last name) used to say that she was predestined for the stage. Her father gave her the name of Lenore because of his fondness for Poe’s poem, “The Raven,” and her childhood was devoted to theatrical yearnings.

(She played Wetona on stage in 1916.)

Name expert Kunio Makino, as quoted in What to call baby? by Tomoko Otake in The Japan Times:

“I think people who come up with bizarre names for their children tend to feel that they couldn’t live the life they wanted to, and they feel that they have been hindered by many rules and restrictions. The only freedom they have at their disposal, they think, is the right to name their child.”

From Hi, My Name Is Héloïse by Héloïse Chung (formerly Kathy Bryant):

I leaned toward names made of calm, feminine sounds that never sounded like someone was yelling at you. The harsh K in Kathy conjured up my mother’s words for me: kigibe, keoji, shikkeuro. Korean for girl, beggar, and shut up. But I still wasn’t ready. I switched from Kathy to “Kate,” which felt like a small step, but not one nearly big enough.

[…]

Once the universe gave me the OK, a little space seemed to open up for the name to find me. And so it was that Héloïse fluttered into my head one day, devastatingly perfect. I’m not sure exactly where it came from. Perhaps some derivation of Luisita (a friend) or Elio (a boy I used to babysit). I guess I have a thing for L names. I honed it, trying it with and without the H and with and without the diacritics. I didn’t want them to be an affectation. Is it gauche to use French spelling if you don’t even speak French? Eff it, I went with the French.

From Why and how Ontarians change their names in the 21st century by Eric Andrew-Gee in The Globe and Mail:

Some change their names by truncation, some by hyphenation, others by amalgamation, others by invention. Some changes are banal, done for everyday reasons – a divorce, a marriage, a mistransliteration (an imprecise conversion from one alphabet to another) – while others are poignant, playful, even poetic.

When I asked people about their choice while reporting this story, virtually no one was glib. Many would go on and on, grateful to talk about a decision that cuts to the marrow of who they are. Others became tearful and, in some cases, shuddered audibly at the sound of their birth names. Some even declined to discuss the subject.

Name quotes #31: Sascha, Nachama, Zella

double quotation mark

From the movie This is Spinal Tap, Marty DiBergi interviewing David St. Hubbins:

Marty: David St. Hubbins…I must admit I’ve never heard anybody with that name.
David: It’s an unusual name. Well, he was an unusual saint. He’s not a very well known saint.
Marty: Oh, there actually is, uh, there was a Saint Hubbins?
David: That’s right, yes.
Marty: What was he the saint of?
David: He was the patron saint of quality footwear.

From “Tajiks weigh ban on ‘bad names’” (Turkish Weekly) which I found while researching names in Tajikistan:

Among older generations, it is not uncommon in Tajikistan to see first names like Khoshok (Fodder), Sangak (Small Stone), Istad (Should Stay), or Pocho (Son-in-Law.)

The reasoning behind the unusual eponyms can be attributed to the superstition that giving a child an unflattering name will make them less desirable, and thus prevent God from taking them away.

[Names like these are often described as “apotropaic,” which is based on the Greek word apotropaios, which means “turning away (evil).”]

From “Keeping the data trackers honest” (Washington Post) by columnist Catherine Rampell:

Meinrath says he wastes a lot of time each month trying to correct faulty automated interpretations about him. He’s a man named Sascha, after all, and corporations irksomely address him as “Mrs.” a lot.

From “Transportation” (Full Grown People) by Wendy Wisner:

The little girl never made it to America.

My grandmother didn’t know how she died. And I was too shocked to ask.

“They named me Nachama, which means comfort, because I was her replacement,” she said.

But no one ever called her that. Her name was Emma.

Vogue editor Anna Wintour (in the February 2011 issue) writing about Tucson-born model Arizona Muse:

When I look at Arizona, I see shadows of Linda Evangelista and Natalia Vodianova, but most of all I see her, a gorgeous, smart, grown-up. And how could anyone resist someone with that name?

From an interview with musician Zella Day (Huffington Post) by Michael Bialas:

What’s the inside story behind your name?

ZD: Zella is from the 1840s. My parents got married in Jerome, Arizona. And when they were getting married, they were looking for baby names. And there was a book of the town’s history in Jerome, and they were scouting locations for the wedding. And they just walked into a museum and they were looking through this book. And one of the main coal miner’s wives was named Zella — 1842. There’s actually a song on the record called “Jerome.” That’s about the ghostly woman behind my name.

From “Destiny” at the blog Futility Closet:

The pickle industry’s “man of the year” in 1948 was named Dill L. Pickle.

I can’t think of anything to say about this.

Names people have given their cars

Parked cars

A number of people come to my blog looking for “car names.”

I’ve recently figured out that, while some of these folks are looking for car names for their babies, far more actually come to find names for their cars.

So, to help this latter group out, I scoured the web to find out what sorts of names people give to their cars.

Here’s a list of over 50 car names I found:

Abraham: “Next, we named the car. My husband said that if we were going to spend a week together, our family and this shiny automobile, it needed a name. And “Abraham” was christened.” -Whitney of Rookie Moms

Ailey: “Of course the first thing I did (after sucking in lungful of that luscious smell) was to name the car. Meet Ailey, my brandy-new, alien green Kia Soul.” -J Monkeys of Writing Secrets of 7 Scribes

Alfred: We took the new car on a road trip to test it out, during the trip we named the car “Alfred”. After the Alfred on Batman, Batman’s Butler. Since we call Hudson “Little Batman”, and the car does escort “Little Batman” around Alfred seemed like a perfect fit.” -Shannon of Bird a la Mode

Angus: “We named the car “Angus,” after Angus Hudson, the butler played by Gordon Jackson in the long-running ITV/PBS series “Upstairs, Downstairs.”” -Kit of Kit Foster’s CarPort

Apollo: “Thank you Apollo for not having a regular trunk. Yes, my car is named Apollo, as in the space ship. Because my car reminds me of a space ship.” -Sammi of Running To Fit

Bianca: “Our new car is named Bianca della Carza. Clearly we went with Bianca because the car itself is white and since I speak Italian it allows me to pretend to speak it fluently. The “della Carza” was added because a local news caster is named “Bianca de la Garza” and as soon as we named the car Bianca the della Carza followed naturally out of our mouths as though we had been fully indoctrinated by our TV watching. Laughing, we decided to go with it. Bianca is in the garage now. It is still hard to believe that we bought a new car, said good bye to Zoe, and weaved our lives together even more all in a single day.” -Melissa of foster & feed

Bono: “Bono is my car. I named him Bono because I had a crush on Felix, my brother’s friend, who happens to be obsessed with U2. Somehow, I thought naming my car Bono would increase my chances. Sadly, I must admit t it did nothing for my chances.” -Anya of Anya Violetta

Bruce: “My car is named Bruce. I’m really not going to elaborate here, but it’s got something to do with the fact that some people seem to think it’s a Transformer and that it, being an inanimate object, actually has a sexual orientation. I’m leaving this one alone.” -The Mishap of Confessions of a Walking Mishap

Charlene: “I was NOT about to let anyone but a professional — thus excluding myself — touch my Charlene. (Yes, my car is named Charlene.)” -Sarah Piper of Bon Appetit Management Company

Christina: “My phone’s name is Verity Loud. My last phone’s name was George. My computer’s name is Francis Lenovo. My brother’s computer’s name is Opal. Our car is named Christina, but we call her variations thereof (Katrina, Chris, Christy, etc). Yep. I live in a family that names their technology. But are we so weird? Why do we give stuffed animals and dolls to children? Why do we own pets?” -Phoeg of Ramber’s Light

Dip: “My car is named Dip.” -Jen of come and rest your bones with me

Dorothy: “Why Dorothy? Well, 1) because her previous owner was an elderly woman who recently passed away, and I named the car in homage to my favorite Golden Girl, Dorothy, to honor the memory of all the awesome old women out there. Also, 2) she is named because “there is no place like home” and Dorothy is the closest thing to “home” I have right now. She is mine, I own her, and if all else fails me in the next few weeks or months while I search for a more permanent “home”, at least I will have Dorothy.” -Emily of GreenDesignCollective Blog

Eeyore: “I was so worried about my car being damaged, but it looks like the trees overhead stopped Eeyore from getting pummeled. Yes, my car is named Eeyore :)”
-Lisa Boland of Bitchin’ Kitsch ‘n’ Kitchen

Eleanor: “I have this thing with my possessions. It may just be the weird side of me, but I embrace it. I have a habit of naming objects, such as cars, the remote control, and my coffee maker. For instance, my car is named Eleanor because the first letter of my license plate is an E and I love the song Eleanor Rigby. My dad’s truck is named Genevieve, because she seems like a classy lady. My boyfriend’s old red car was named Bertha, because she was a big lady. His new car is named Stella, because, really, why not? My laptop is named Scarlet because she has a red cover. My Keurig coffee maker is named Monica for no particular reason – I just happened to look at it and it was the first name that came into my mind on Christmas morning. And so when I bought my Blackberry Bold 9650 back in July, I knew she would need a name. She would be with me at all times of day. As I held her in my hands in the Verizon Wireless store for the first time, it was like the name came to me immediately. She was wrapped in a blue silicone case that would protect her from bumps and scratches. Her name would be Belle, like after bluebell flowers.” -Therese of Therese Zdazenski

Elenor: “Lucky me, lucky me, my wonderful husband surprised me with a brand new Honda CRV Sport in a lovely shade of sage green for our anniversary. It was hard to say good bye to my beloved and trusty Elliot my Honda Element, but I have made the transition rather quickly. The new car is named Elenor…works well with the existing nick name Ellie. Sounds a little silly, I know, but I have had a wonderful relationship with Elliot over the last few years and he’s taken me over 152,000 kms safely while I’ve been out and about. Elliot never let me down, always started on the coldest of winter days, was able to make it up Scenic Caves Road in the worst conditions and took me to the cottage (my favourite place in the world besides Collingwood) always a happy road trip. Elliot and I had a remarkable relationship. He will be missed, but I’m looking forward to a great relationship with Ellie, the sleek looking, smooth running new car in my life (with a fantastic sunroof).” -Julie Card of Out & About

Elphaba: “I just wanted to say thank you to all of the lovely people that suggested names for my new oven. I thought Glinda fit as our car is called Elphaba!” -Lorraine Elliott of Not Quite Nigella

Elvira: “My car is named Elvira (I know, I named her). Last year, I blogged about my car topless (she is a convertible) under the title – Elvira Topless!!!. The post included pictures me in my convertible. Since then, my blog has picked up a lot of traffic from men (well, some women too) searching the term Elvira topless. I have always found this funny and even blogged about it a second time under, Elvira Topless. As a result, my blog now ranks 3rd in Google results for “Elvira topless”.” -Tom Whittaker of Tom Whittaker’s Blog

FitzWilliam: “In fact, my car is named Fitzwilliam, after Mr. Darcy. Yes, I am aware of how pathetic that is. And I’m okay with this.” -Sharon of The Book Barbies

Fjodor: “Our car is named Fjodor. (Yes, of course after Dostojevskij). Just sayin’. :)” -Torunn of A Little Nouveau

Gracie: “I name inanimate objects. Example: My espresso machine is named Max. My car is named Gracie. And my iphone is named Florence.” -Danielle of Taking Notes…Coast to Coast

Hans: “I’ve never missed covered parking so much in my life! It was like the Snow Miser sharted all over Hans. (yes, my car is named Hans. Judge if you must.)” -Megan of Six One in Heels

Heather: “I am mad at Tyler for waking up my shopping jones though. Did you see the way those broad were ragging in that movie?! Luckily, Heather Hunter Honda (yea my car is named after a porn star – don’t ask) had a major crisis that put a serious dent in my pocketbook so I’m banned from the mall for now. I can still dream…” -Danielle of Songs in the Key of Life

Ivy: “My car is named Ivy. She’s my first and only car that I have.” -Pakou of Off the Front Porch

Izzy: “My car is named Izzy. The car before was Adam. My phone is Janice. My AC unit is Jasmine. I like to name inanimate objects.” -Rachel of lala Lists

Karmit: “I am a big fan of the Muppets. Our car is named Karmit and a friend played “Rainbow Connection” on his guitar for us during our wedding ceremony.” -Gary and Louise of Lone Star on a Lark

Linda: “We got so many fantastic submissions! After pouring over them all, we had to choose just one… Introducing Linda, our transportation, and our travel companion.” -The Dudes of Cig Cross Canada Tour

Linus: “Linus is my car. I named Linus, because as I stated before I am terrified he will magically explode, and so when I am driving home (no joke) I talk to him. We chat about traffic, sometime I am asking if he has a flat tire or if it’s just the road. It took a while for me to trust Linus, since my last vehicle Vern let his tire fly off on the freeway, Vern and I had a really shaky relationship after that. So much so, that I had to sell him.” -Miki of Becoming What I Always Was

Little Dorritt: “My car’s name is Little Dorrit.” -Sarah Allen of From Sarah, With Joy

Lola: “Owning a Corolla, I guess the reason why I named my car Lola is for my tag line “Lola the Corolla.” I thought it was funny… As for the other things I guess I just named them just to give them a personality, a character.” -Shawn Tripputi of San Jacinto Times Staff Blog

Lorraine: “Another thing you can see in these pictures is my bike. Her name is Alexandra, “Lexie” for short, and I’m very excited for springtime rides. For your information, my camera is named Pepe (as in Pepe le Pew, the romantic skunk) and my car is named Lorraine. Do you name inanimate objects? It’s fun; you should give it a try.” -Sara of SK{ru}SH

Lucille: “Those of you who are familiar with the now-cancelled best-TV-show-ever Arrested Development should notice a resemblance to the car that was driven in the show by Lucille Bluth. While I could not find a picture of the car itself, I can provide a picture of Lucille, for whom my car is named.” -Brian of Ponystyle Industries

Lucky: “So the most recent blog-worthy thing that we have done is buy a new CAR! It is beautiful and we love it! We “named” the car lucky (c’mon you know everyone names their cars) because it was, to say the least, lucky that we were able to buy it.” -Brynn of The Dexters

Lucy: “Her car is a ’65 Ford Falcon named Shirley. Ironically, my car is named Lucy aka the Diamond in the Rust.” -Amber Von Felts of I Heart Everything

Maggie: “Just to clear up the subject on Maggie. Maggie is my car. I named her when I purchased her a few years ago. I thought that since she was a red car (oh yeah, the car is female) that entitles her to a red-head name… and Maggie sounds like a red headed person. All that came to me was an Irish gal name Maggie… so Maggie is a red head, possibly Irish and she kisses boy cars… really she does. I parked at a Wal-mart parking lot and she gave the blue chevy impala, which was parked across from us, a little peck on the lips. Thats just how she is I guess. She flirts.” -kw muah of The journal of an amateur dabbler

Marcus: “We zipped in for a rather late 1 pm brunch in Marcus (yes, our car is named Marcus and yes, he zips, not cruises)” -libbyty of The Little Bow Girl

Marty: “Marty Mazda. I named the car Marty because, well, it just wasn’t clear if he was a boy or a girl. (Even when you looked under the hood *wink* *wink*.)” -Lisa of Chick Lit is Not Dead

Max: “My mother and I are driving somewhere separately – her in the purple van and me in Max. (Sidenote: Max is my car. I named him after a male stripper named Max Steele.)” -99donuts of 99donuts

Merlot: “My new car is named MERLOT for her sparkling wine color.” -Dianne of Dianne Johnson

Moby: “We took that money and decided we wanted to buy a car outright and not have any payments. K said she didn’t really care what we got, as long as it drove nice and wasn’t a white four door. 2 weeks later, we purchased a 1996 white 4 door ford Taurus (the model that still had those ugly oval shaped back windows). On account of the shape, size, and color, we named the car Moby.” -rebb of rebb against the machine!

Molly: “My car is named Molly, after Molly Weasley. I bought the car shortly after Deathly Hallows came out and found Molly a fitting name because, like Molly, my car is little, red and feisty.” -Morgan of Becoming Rooks

Nancy: “I named the car Nancy and she became mine.” -Jess of Bowl of Bees

Pearl: “About 15 years ago, a friend of mine loaned me a string of pearls to wear to my nephew’s wedding. I liked the pearls so much my husband offered to buy me some for Christmas. Unfortunately, before Christmas, his old car, which had well over 100,000 miles on it, began developing a series of problems and it became apparent he needed a new car, which meant no expensive Christmas present. I preferred having husband drive a safe vehicle to wearing pearls to pick him up at the side of the rode when he broke down, so a new car it was. I named the car Pearl.” -Coleslaw of Word Salad

Penny: “I also recently noticed that on top me naming my heat pack Glenn, my guinea pig is named Maggie, and my car is named Penny…I’ve been naming things after Walking Dead characters even before the show aired!” -Nicole of Crippie’s Corner

Peyman: “Willie brought us the car today right after work. We couldn’t be happier to have “The Peyman” in our possession at last! We named the car Peyman after our dear friend from camp. He is a great guy and he has quite a beard… He deserves a car to be named after him!” -Sarah J Cole of FollowSarah

Phyllis Nefler: “this morning the check engine light came on in my car. stinks! phyllis nefler (our car’s name) has a few other problems and needs to go see the car doctor soon. (p.s. our car is named after the movie troop beverly hills) :)” -Amanda of The Shepard Life

Pompidou: “My car is named after the Pompidou Centre located in the heart of Paris, a building with iconic architecture of the twentieth century, designed by Renzo Piano and Richard Rogers, the Pomipdou Centre opened to the public in 1977. Also the year of my birth.” -Trina of Eskimo to the World

Reznor: “And if you haven’t guessed it by now, my car is named after Trent Reznor from NIN.” -Danielle of Porcelain Heart, Ivory Tooth

Sacagawea: “Our car is named “Sacagawea”, because she takes us places.” -Rachel of rachelcoker

Sam: “I have a habit of giving proper names to many of the inanimate objects in my life. My car is named Sam. My first car was Burt – Burt was a wonderful car of some notoriety due to his many bumper stickers, totally un-me purple airbrushed racing stripes, the brutal-looking dent in the side where a drunk driver hit me and I never got it fixed, and the appalling among of trash accumulated inside…I was a messy 20-something. I used to have two bean bags named Clark and Aunt Bethany in college.” -Ruby Sara of Pagan Godspell

Shirley: “My car is named Shirley because my best friend’s car is named Laverne. Normally I don’t like naming things like cars.” -Kate of Leaving the Land of Cotton

Simon Templar: “I mean, my car is named Simon Templar (and there’s a sign of the Saint taped up in one of the windows, just to further reassure everyone that I am completely crazy).” -Millie of Classic Forever

Skarmory: I named the car “Skarmory”, which is the name of a Steel-type Pokemon. It was doubly appropriate since it’s a steel gray car, and the word ‘car’ is phonetically embedded in it.” -Cheryl of Twenty-Sided Woman

Sophia: “My car, Sophia, is leased through VW and her time with me is ending.” -Jess of Just What Jess Is Up To

Sylvia: “This is my car! I named it Sylvia. Sylvia the suzuki. It’s pretty small (I wish is was smaller!) and I got it brand spannking factory new. I still have the plastic on the seats. I have yet to hit anything! Yay!” -Kait of of Adventures in Kaitland

Trails: So who’s old enough to remember Roy Rogers and Dale Evans and their farewell song “Happy Trails”? Okay, it silly, but it works! Our RV is named “Happy” and our car is named “Trails” since it trails behind us when we’re toolin’ down the road.” -Nan & Gary of Happy Trails…on the road again

Veronica: “So much that my car is named, ahem, Veronica. Yeah I have no shame.” -TiffanyD of Makeup by Tiffany D

Which of the above do you like best?

Do you have a name for your car? If so, what is it, and why did you choose it?

Update, 2013: Here’s a fun Name Your Car Formula I posted for Name Your Car Day (October 2).

Update, 2022: I just came across a quote from Vanna White, who moved to Los Angeles in 1980 with $1,000. She used $700 for her first month’s rent, then “took the remaining $300 and bought a white Pinto. Penelope was the car’s name. My mother always named her cars Nellie Bell.” (Source: “Woman of letters hits the road,” USA Weekend, 24 May 1987)

Image by moinzon from Pixabay