How popular is the baby name Bernardo in the United States right now? How popular was it historically? Find out using the graph below! Plus, check out all the blog posts that mention the name Bernardo.

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Popularity of the Baby Name Bernardo


Posts that Mention the Name Bernardo

Popular baby names in Brazil, 2021

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According to Brazil’s Transparência do Registro Civil (part of Arpen-Brasil), the most popular baby names in the country in 2021 were Helena and Miguel.

Here are the Brazil’s top 10 girl names and top 10 boy names of 2021:

Girl Names

  1. Helena, 21,890 baby girls
  2. Alice, 20,381
  3. Laura, 18,448
  4. Maria Alice, 14,677
  5. Valentina, 11,643
  6. Heloísa, 11,355
  7. Maria Clara, 10,980
  8. Maria Cecília, 10,850
  9. Maria Julia, 10,235
  10. Sophia, 10,163

Boy Names

  1. Miguel, 28,301 baby boys
  2. Arthur, 26,655
  3. Gael, 23,973
  4. Heitor, 22,368
  5. Theo, 19,853
  6. Davi, 18,304
  7. Gabriel, 17,159
  8. Bernardo, 15,935
  9. Samuel, 15,563
  10. João Miguel, 13,254

The swift rise of Gael is notable. In 2019, Gael wasn’t even in the boys’ top 50. But the name shot up to 10th place in 2020, then jumped to 3rd in 2021. (Anyone out there have any theories about the sudden trendiness of Gael in Brazil?)

In 2020, the top two names were also Helena and Miguel. In 2019, they were Enzo Gabriel and Maria Eduarda.

Sources: Miguel e Helena são os nomes mais registrados no Brasil em 2021; veja lista, Enzo? Valentina? Veja nomes mais comuns registrados em 2021

Baby name story: Linda Yorba

I’m sure you’ve heard of Yorba Linda, the affluent city in southern California whose name means “Beautiful Yorba” in English.

Did you know it was named in honor of wealthy rancher Bernardo Yorba (1800-1858), son of Spanish soldier and early California settler Jose Yorba?

Bernardo had 21 children, one of whom was a son named Vicente (b. 1844). One of Vicente’s children was a son named Bernardo (b. 1894), who also went on to have a son named Bernardo (b. 1921).

That last Bernardo, great-grandson of the original, had a high school sweetheart named Margaret.

Bernardo married Margaret in 1943. He soon left to fight in WWII, but not before Margaret became pregnant with their first child. She had the baby while he was overseas.

Margaret recalls:

“When I was in high school I remembered sitting with my friends at noon one time and talking about getting married and I said, ‘What if I married Bernardo Yorba and named our first baby Linda. She’d be Linda Yorba from Yorba Linda.’ And we all thought that was so hysterical. So of course, I named the baby Linda–it just came out of my mouth.”

After Linda, they went on to have nine more children: Cantana, Lisa, Bernardo, Nichola, Antonio, Miguel, Christopher, Jaime and Peter.

Source: Humphreys, Carol. “The Yorbas.” Orange Coast Magazine Feb. 2002: 76-79.

[Two more WWII-era Linda stories: Linda Ann, Linda]

New saint names: Damien, Jeanne, Nuno, Zygmunt

Some of my favorite saints — St. Therese, St. Francis, St. Faustina and St. Bruno — are commemorated in early October. So it seems fitting to me that five new saints would be canonized right around this time of year. (Next weekend, to be precise.) The five blesseds in question are:

  • Bl. Jozef de Veuster, a.k.a. Father Damien (1840-1889) of Belgium and, later, Molokai.
  • Bl. Rafael Arnáiz Barón (1911-1938) of Spain.
  • Bl. Jeanne Jugan, a.k.a. Mary of the Cross (1792-1879) of France.
  • Bl. Zygmunt Szczesny Felinski (1822-1895) of Poland.
  • Bl. Francisco Coll y Guitart (1812-1875) of Spain.

And this is actually the second batch of saints for 2009. The first group, canonized in April, consisted of:

  • St. Arcangelo Tadini (1846-1912) of Italy.
  • St. Bernardo Tolomei (1272-1348) of Italy.
  • St. Caterina Volpicelli (1839-1894) of Italy.
  • St. Gertrude Comensoli (1847-1903) of Italy.
  • St. Nuno Álvares Pereira (1360-1431) of Portugal.

As far as saint names go, I believe Nuno is a brand new one. There are Bernardos and Gertrudes and Jeannes and Rafaels, but no Nunos. Behind the Name suggests that Nuno is derived from the Latin word nonus, meaning ninth. Wikipedia, on the other hand, lists other sources such as the Latin word nonnus, meaning monk or tutor.