How popular is the baby name Mael in the United States right now? How popular was it historically? Find out using the graph below! Plus, check out all the blog posts that mention the name Mael.

The graph will take a few seconds to load, thanks for your patience. (Don't worry, it shouldn't take nine months.) If it's taking too long, try reloading the page.


Popularity of the Baby Name Mael


Posts that Mention the Name Mael

Popular baby names in France, 2020

France

According to France’s National Institute of Statistics and Economic Studies (INSEE), the most popular baby names in the country in 2020 were Jade (pronounced zhad) and Léo.

Here are France’s top 10 girl names and top 10 boy names of 2020:

Girl Names

  1. Jade, 3,814 baby girls
  2. Louise, 3,811
  3. Emma, 3,478
  4. Alice, 2,987
  5. Ambre, 2,746
  6. Lina, 2,731
  7. Rose, 2,664
  8. Chloé, 2,574
  9. Mia, 2,458
  10. Léa, 2,429

Boy Names

  1. Léo, 4,496 baby boys
  2. Gabriel, 4,415
  3. Raphaël, 3,970
  4. Arthur, 3,800
  5. Louis, 3,795
  6. Jules, 3,551
  7. Adam, 3,386
  8. Maël, 3,292
  9. Lucas, 3,245
  10. Hugo, 3,129

In the girls’ top 10, Mia replaced Mila.

The boys’ top 10 includes the same 10 names, but in a different order.

In 2019, the top two names in France were Emma and Gabriel.

Source: Classement des prénoms en France depuis 1900 – Insee

Popular baby names in France, 2019

According to France’s National Institute of Statistics and Economic Studies (INSEE), the most popular baby names in the country last year were (again) Emma and Gabriel.

Here are France’s top 10 girl names and top 10 boy names of 2019:

Girl Names

  1. Emma, 3,944 baby girls
  2. Jade, 3,820
  3. Louise, 3,752
  4. Alice, 3,294
  5. Lina, 2,948
  6. Chloé, 2,862
  7. Rose, 2,704
  8. Léa, 2,689
  9. Mila, 2,681
  10. Ambre, 2,654

Boy Names

  1. Gabriel, 4,987 baby boys
  2. Léo, 4,653
  3. Raphaël, 4,454
  4. Arthur, 4,005
  5. Louis, 3,947
  6. Lucas, 3,737
  7. Adam, 3,668
  8. Jules, 3,542
  9. Hugo, 3,493
  10. Maël, 3,383

In the girls’ top 10, Ambre replaced Anna.

The boys’ top 10 includes the same 10 names, but in a different order.

Finally, names that saw notable increases in usage from 2018 to 2019 include:

  • Girl names: Joy, Arya, Octavia, Nola, Liyah, Chelsea
  • Boy names: Tiago/Tyago, Ayden, Owen

Sources: Classement des prénoms en France depuis 1900 – Insee, Prénoms des Français: Emma et Gabriel bientôt détrônés?

Popular and unique baby names in Alberta, 2019

According to the government of Alberta, the most popular baby names in the Canadian province in 2019 were Olivia and Noah.

Here are Alberta’s top 10 girl names and top 10 boy names of 2019:

Girl Names

  1. Olivia, 229 baby girls
  2. Charlotte, 188
  3. Sophia, 181
  4. Emma, 178
  5. Ava, 161
  6. Amelia, 159
  7. Emily, 150
  8. Abigail, 141
  9. Hannah, 137
  10. Elizabeth, 124

Boy Names

  1. Noah, 275 baby boys
  2. Liam, 234
  3. Oliver, 225
  4. Ethan, 213
  5. Jack, 198
  6. William, 185
  7. Lucas, 174
  8. Owen, 167
  9. Benjamin, 163
  10. Jacob, 162

In the girls’ top 10, Hannah returned and ousted Harper.

In the boys’ top 10, Owen replaced Logan, Alexander, and James. (It’s uneven because there were two ties in the 2018 top 10.)

Rare baby names that were bestowed just once in Alberta last year include…

Unique Girl NamesUnique Boy Names
Anesidora, Aviendha, Brungus, Castrence, Calluna, Doxa, Eilish, Fitia-Jane, Giannajoe, Historia, Isleigh, Jennathul, Kriscilla, Kipper, Kurdistan, Lilith-Luna, Lillix, Loonskin, Maxeld, Navaline, Neepin, Ovalah, Phoemella, Ruftael, Starbrit, Tenacious, Timely, Uzuvira, Verily, Waskway, Xanthal, Yuvleen, ZsanelleAbundance, Apollo-July, BlueJay, Couloir, Cousteau, Cowboy, Despot, Ellejon, Felix-Ivan, Glenter, Gravity, Handsome-Jack, Harmonick, Humbly, Iguttaq, Iskotew, Jenzieland, Kitterick, Luxton, Maxjay, Nomatic, Ozmo, Pétain, Ranxel, Revic, Sprocket, Thundersky, Uael, Varis, Whirlwind, Xiron, Ylan-Maël, Zagger

Explanations and/or potential influences for a few of the above:

  • Aviendha was a character from Wheel of Time book series (1990-2013) by author Robert Jordan.
  • Waskway is the Cree word for “birch” or “birch tree.”
  • Couloir is the word for “a steep gully in alpine terrain” (from the French word for “corridor” or “hallway”).
  • Iguttaq is the Inuktitut word for “bumblebee.”
  • Iskotew is the Cree word for “fire.”
  • Nomatic is a company that creates minimalist travel products.
  • Revic (“revolutionary” + “optics”) is a company that makes rifle scopes.

In 2018, the top two names in Alberta were Olivia and Liam.

Sources: Alberta’s Top Baby Names, Alberta reveals top baby names of 2019, Online Cree Dictionary, Couloir – Avalanche.org

Popular baby names in France, 2018

According to INSEE (Institut national de la statistique et des études économiques), the most popular baby names in France in 2018 were Emma and Gabriel.

Here are France’s top 10 girl names and top 10 boy names of 2018:

Girl Names

  1. Emma, 4,369 baby girls
  2. Jade, 3,977
  3. Louise, 3,766
  4. Alice, 3,313
  5. Chloé, 3126
  6. Lina, 2,908
  7. Léa, 2798
  8. Rose, 2,720
  9. Anna, 2,603
  10. Mila, 2,581

Boy Names

  1. Gabriel, 5,419 baby boys
  2. Raphaël, 4591
  3. Léo, 4446
  4. Louis, 4415
  5. Lucas, 3979
  6. Adam, 3897
  7. Arthur, 3755
  8. Jules, 3698
  9. Hugo, 3686
  10. Maël, 3259

Two baby names that are trendy in France right now are Kylian and Aya — Kylian because of French soccer player Kylian Mbappé, and Aya because of French-Malian pop singer Aya Nakamura.

Strangely, I’ve never covered the French rankings before. I have posted about Paris a couple of times, though.

Sources: Classement des prénoms en France depuis 1900 – Insee, The ‘foreign’ baby name that’s still top of the charts in France

How to pronounce French names: Anaïs, Étienne, Guillaume, Hélène

How to pronounce French names

At first glance, Guillaume always looks like gobbledygook to me. It’s the French form of William — that much I know — but it takes a few seconds for me to remember that it’s pronounced ghee-ohm, not not gwill-awm or gwee-awm.

And it’s not just Guillaume that trips me up. I find many other French names (Étienne, Edwige, Anaïs, etc.) equally tricky to pronounce.

So for those of us who struggle with French names, here are some simplified rules of French pronunciation, plus names to illustrate each rule.

This list is far from comprehensive, and my pronunciations are just approximations, but hopefully my fellow non-French speakers out there will find it helpful nonetheless.

French Pronunciation + French Names

AU: The vowel combination “AU” is pronounced like a long o.

  • Paul, in French, is pronounced pohl.
  • Margaux, a French form of Margaret, is pronounced mar-goh.

CH: The letter combination “CH” is typically pronounced sh.

  • Charles, in French, is pronounced shahrl.

D, P, S, T, X, Z: The six consonants “D,” “P,” “S,” “T,” “X” and “Z,” when at the end of a word, are typically silent.

  • Arnaud, the French form of Arnold, is pronounced ar-noh.
  • Denis, the French form of Dennis, is pronounced de-nee (remember the Blondie song?).
  • Lucas, in French, is pronounced loo-kah.
  • Louis, in French, is pronounced loo-ee (think Louis Vuitton).

…They’re not always silent, though. Here are some exceptions:

  • Alois, the French form of Aloysius, is pronounced ah-loh-ees.
  • Anaïs, a French form of Anna, is pronounced ah-nah-ees.
  • David, in French, is pronounced dah-veed.

Ë: The pronunciation of “Ë” (E with a trema) is like the e in the English word “bet.”

  • Gaël and Gaëlle are pronounced gah-el or gai-el.
  • Joël and Joëlle are pronounced zhoh-el.
  • Maël and Maëlle are pronounced mah-el or mai-el.
  • Noël and Noëlle are pronounced noh-el.

É: The pronunciation of “É” (E with an acute accent) is somewhere between the ee in “see” and the e in “bet.”

  • Noé, the French masculine form of Noah, is pronounced noh-ee.
  • Salomé, in French, is pronounced sah-loh-mee.

G: The consonant “G” is soft (zh) when followed by “E” or “I” but hard (gh) otherwise.

  • Georges, the French form of George, is pronounced zhorzh.
  • Guy, in French, is pronounced ghee.

H: The consonant “H” is silent.

  • Hélène, the French form of Helen, is pronounced eh-lehn.

I: The vowel “I,” and the forms Ï, and Î, are all pronounced ee.

  • Loïc, a French form of Louis, is pronounced loh-eek.

J: The consonant “J” is pronounced zh.

  • Jacques, the French form of Jacob, is pronounced zhahk.

LL: The letter combination “LL” is typically pronounced like an l.

  • Achille, the French form of Achilles, is pronounced ah-sheel.
  • Lucille, the French form of Lucilla, is pronounced loo-seel.

…But in some cases “LL” is pronounced like a y.

  • Guillaume, the French form of William, is pronounced ghee-yohm or ghee-ohm.

OI: The vowel combination “OI” is pronounced wah.

  • Antoine, the French form of Antony, is pronounced an-twahn.
  • Grégoire, the French form of Gregory, is pronounced gre-gwahr.

OU: The vowel combination “OU” is pronounced oo.

  • Lilou is pronounced lee-loo.

R: The consonant “R,” when at the end of a word, is typically pronounced.

  • Clair, the French masculine form of Claire, is pronounced kler.
  • Edgar, in French, is pronounced ed-gahr.

…When the “R” is preceded by an “E,” though, it is not pronounced.

  • Gauthier, the French form of Walter, is pronounced goh-tee-yay or goh-tyay (remember Gotye?).
  • Olivier, the French form of Oliver, is pronounced oh-lee-vee-yay or oh-lee-vyay (think Laurence Olivier).

TH: The letter combination “TH” is typically pronounced like a t (which makes sense, since “H” is silent).

  • Thibault, the French form of Theobald, is pronounced tee-boh.

TI: The letter combination “TI” is sometimes pronounced like an s or sy.

  • Laëtitia is pronounced lay-tee-sya.

W: The consonant “W” is pronounced like a v.

  • Edwige, the French form of Hedwig, is pronounced ed-veezh.

And finally, just a few more French names that I tend to have trouble with.

  • Anatole is pronounced ah-nah-tohl.
  • Étienne, the French form of Stephen, is pronounced eh-tyen.
  • Geoffroy, the French form of Geoffrey, is pronounced zho-fwah.
  • Ghislain and Ghislaine are pronounced either ghee-len or zheez-len.
  • Ignace, the French form of Ignatius, is pronounced ee-nyas.

*

Those aren’t too hard, right?

That’s what I tell myself…and then I come across Guillaume in the wild and my mind goes blank all over again. :)

If you know French and would like to add to the above (either another rule of pronunciation or a more precise pronunciation for a particular name) please leave a comment.

If you’re not a French speaker, here’s my question: Which French name gives you the most trouble?

Sources: Beginning French Pronunciation, French e, è, é, ê, ë – what’s the difference?, Google Translate

P.S. Interested in seeing how popular the French names above are in the U.S.? Here are some popularity graphs: Alois, Achille, Anaïs, Anatole, Antoine, Arnaud, Clair, Denis, Edwige, Étienne, Gaël, Gaëlle, Georges, Grégoire, Guillaume, Guy, Hélène, Ignace, Jacques, Laëtitia, Lilou, Loïc, Lucille, Maël, Maëlle, Margaux, Noé, Olivier, Salomé, Thibault.

Image background by RD LH from Pixabay