How popular is the baby name Antoine in the United States right now? How popular was it historically? Find out using the graph below! Plus, check out all the blog posts that mention the name Antoine.

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Popularity of the Baby Name Antoine


Posts that Mention the Name Antoine

Baby Name Story: Griezmann Mbappé

Teodora Pacaje and baby Griezmann Mbappé Chambi Pacaje (Jan. 2022).
Teodora holding Griezmann Mbappé

The first baby born in the Chilean city of Copiapó in 2022 was a boy named Griezmann Mbappé in honor of French soccer players Antoine Griezmann (pronounced an-twahn gree-ez-man) and Kylian Mbappé (pronounced kee-lee-ahn em-bah-pay).

The baby was born at Copiapó Regional Hospital at around 9 pm on New Year’s Day.

Here’s how his mother, Teodora Pacaje, explained the name to local reporters: “We love football. I chose the first name and his dad gave him the name Mbappé.”

Ironically, the parents of the initial baby named Griezmann Mbappé — born in south-west France in late 2018 — were forced by a judge to rename him in nearly 2019. (They chose “Dany Noé.”)

Sources: Parents name baby after favourite footballers but people fear he will be bullied, Servicio Salud Atacama on Twitter, Griezmann: not just a poster boy, French couple barred from calling son Griezmann Mbappe after football heroes
Image: @SSaludAtacama

Where did the baby name Antron come from?

antron, advertisement, baby name, 1960s
Advertisement in a Georgia newspaper from late 1961

The name Antron began appearing in the U.S. baby name data in 1962:

  • 1969: 11 baby boys named Antron
  • 1968: 6 baby boys named Antron
  • 1967: 7 baby boys named Antron
  • 1966: 5 baby boys named Antron
  • 1965: unlisted
  • 1964: unlisted
  • 1963: unlisted
  • 1962: 6 baby boys named Antron [debut]
  • 1961: unlisted

This one, like Qiana and Trevira, can be traced back to a rather unusual source: synthetic fiber.

In 1960, DuPont trademarked the brand name “Antron” for a new nylon fiber. In DuPont’s Annual Report from 1960, the company explained that, “because of its unusual clover cross-section, [Antron] improves the luster and coverage of many types of apparel and home furnishing fabrics.”

Later the same year, the word Antron started showing up in newspaper and magazine advertisements.

By the second half of the ’60s, the name was regularly appearing in the baby name data — not surprising, as more and more ads were mentioning Antron. An issue of the New York Times from August of 1965, for instance, included a 20-plus-page DuPont advertising supplement called “The Great American Knits” that showcased Antron along with two other DuPont-created synthetic fibers, Orlon and Dacron.

Expectant parents may have found “Antron” more enticing than options like “Orlon” and “Dacron” because it was similar to traditional boy names like Antoine and Anton.

What are your thoughts on the baby name Antron?

Sources: Antron (fabric) – Vintage Fashion Guild, Orlon! Dacron! Antron! The Great American Knits of Fall 1965
Image: Al Dixon advertisement. Thomasville Times-Enterprise 23 Oct. 1961: 6.

Baby Names in the News: Alie, Italo, Khongolose

Some recent and not-so-recent baby names from the news…

Alie: A baby girl born in New York in December of 2018 was named Alie in honor of the Long Island Expressway (called the “L-I-E”), where she was born in a minivan on the side of the road. (Queens Daily Eagle)

Bale: A baby boy born in Wales in November of 2016 was named Bale in honor of Welsh soccer player Gareth Bale. Another boy born in Wales a month later was also named Bale for the same reason. (Wales Online; Wales Online)

Griezmann Mbappe: A baby boy born in France in November of 2018 was named Griezmann Mbappe in honor of French soccer players Antoine Griezmann and Kylian Mbappe. (Deadspin)

Italo: The first baby born in Rome in 2019 was named Italo, in honor of Italy. (His parents are Sri Lankan.) (Daily Mirror)

James Daniel: A baby boy born in Essex, England, in December of 2018 was named James Daniel after police officers James Ireland and Dan Bellingham, who’d helped the parents reach the hospital in time for the birth. (ITV)

Kongolose: A baby boy born in South Africa on January 8, 2018 (the 107th anniversary of the founding of the African National Congress political party) was named Siko Luka Khongolose — the second middle name being a “colloquial Zulu term for the African National Congress.” (TimesLIVE)

Liberty: A baby girl born in Texas in October of 2018 was named Liberty in honor of Texas Congressman Ron Paul. (The Gazette)

Mickey: A baby girl born in California in December of 2018 was named Zoele Mickey — middle name in honor of paramedic Mickey Huber, who’d helped her mother escape a wildfire and reach a medical center to give birth. (KRCR)

Mikkael: A baby boy born in Ohio in November of 2018 was named Henry Mikkael — middle name in honor of Dr. Mikkael Sekeres, who’d helped his mother overcome leukemia in 2012. (Fox)

Sierra: A baby girl born in Tennessee in November of 2018 was named Isabella Sierra-Marie — middle name in honor of Sierra Reprogal, the police officer who’d helped deliver her in a car on the side of the road. (Yahoo! News)

Skrot (rejected): A baby boy born in Sweden in September of 2018 was almost named Bjørn Skrot, but the Swedish government rejected the middle name (which means “scrap”) because it might “cause discomfort for the bearer.” (The Local)

Snow: The first baby born in Baltimore in 2019 was named Snow Violet Taylor. (WBAL)

Some Names from New Orleans

beignet, food, new orleans
Beignets at Café Beignet

My husband and I hung out in New Orleans for about 48 hours in mid-December. It rained almost the entire time, but we still managed to get out and spot a few interesting names!

First, an unexpected food name: Beignet (pron. ben-YAY), which literally means “bump” in French. In terms of food, it’s fried dough with sugar on top. In terms of names, though, it’s been bestowed as a middle at least three times, according to the records I’ve seen. These human Beignets were all girls born in the ’80s and ’90s in Texas and Oklahoma.

We briefly visited the New Orleans Jazz and Jean Lafitte National Historical Parks, where we learned about people like…

  • Fate Marable, African American jazz pianist/bandleader (“Fate” could be short for Lafayette)
  • Cloaner Smith, African American quilter
  • Mrs. Louisianaise Daigle, Cajun healer

We also learned about various locations, including Atchafalaya.

Speaking of locations…while wandering around the city, we spotted ghost signs for Antoine’s Restaurant (which I mentioned in the Caresse post) and Uneeda Biscuits (I discovered the name “Uneeda” on a trip to Kansas City):

uneeda, new orleans, baby name

Aboard the Steamboat Natchez we noticed that the two boilers are named Thelma and Louise.

And finally, how about the name “New Orleans” itself? In the records I found dozens, including New Orleans Taylor, a 13-year-old girl living with her family in Louisiana at the time of the 1930 U.S. Census:

new orleans taylor, 1930, census

[Want more travel names? See my posts on Alaska, the Czech Republic, the Grand Canyon, and Hawaii.]

What turned Caresse into a baby name?

dinner at antoines, book, 1940s, caresse, baby name

The unusual name Caresse saw its highest usage in the late ’80s and early ’90s (no doubt thanks to commercials for Caress soap, which was launched by Lever in 1985). But it debuted in the U.S. baby name data way back in the 1940s:

  • 1951: unlisted
  • 1950: 5 baby girls named Caresse
  • 1949: 7 baby girls named Caresse [debut]
  • 1948: unlisted
  • 1947: unlisted

Where did it come from?

The 1949 novel Dinner at Antoine’s by Frances Parkinson Keyes, which became one of the bestselling books in the United States that year. The story was also serialized in several newspapers.

It was murder mystery set in New Orleans; the “Antoine’s” of the title refers to the famous Antoine’s Restaurant. One of the characters, Caresse Lalande, was a radio star (her show was called Fashions of Yesteryear). She was also carrying on an affair with her sister’s husband, Léonce. When the sister (named Odile) ended up murdered, both Caresse and Léonce (and many other people in their circle) became suspects.

The name got even more exposure that year thanks to the Literary Guild Book Club, which ran ads that featured not just Dinner at Antoine’s, but Caresse specifically:

caresse in literary guild advertisement

The French word Caresse (and also the English word Cherish) can be traced back to the Latin word carus, meaning “dear, costly, beloved.”

What do you think of the baby names Caresse and Caress? Would you use them?

Sources: Publishers Weekly list of bestselling novels in the United States in the 1940s – Wikipedia, Caress – Online Etymology Dictionary
Image: from the October 1949 issue of Radio Mirror