How popular is the baby name Cedar in the United States right now? How popular was it historically? Find out using the graph below! Plus, see baby names similar to Cedar and check out all the blog posts that mention the name Cedar.

The graph will take a few seconds to load, thanks for your patience. (Don't worry, it shouldn't take nine months.) If it's taking too long, try reloading the page.


Popularity of the Baby Name Cedar

Number of Babies Named Cedar

Born in the U.S. Since 1880

Posts that Mention the Name Cedar

100+ Baby Names for 100 Years of the NPS

national park service 100th birthday (zion poster, 1938)The U.S. National Park Service has a birthday coming up!

When the NPS was created on August 25, 1916, there were only 35 national parks and monuments. (The world’s first, Yellowstone, had been established in 1872.)

Nowadays the agency oversees 411 units. These units are located in the 50 states and beyond, and include national monuments (82), national historic sites (78), national parks (59), national historical parks (50), national memorials (30), national battlefields (11), national seashores (10), national lakeshores (4), national scenic trails (3), and more.

Let’s celebrate the upcoming centenary with over 100 baby names that pay tribute to the national parks specifically:

  • Acadia for Acadia National Park.
  • Angel or Angela for Grand Canyon National Park’s Angel’s Window.
  • Arrow for the NPS emblem, the arrowhead.
  • Archer for Arches National Park.
  • Barbara for Channel Islands National Park’s Santa Barbara Island.
  • Bathsheba for Hot Springs National Park’s Bathhouse Row.
  • Bay for any of the parks featuring a bay, such as Glacier Bay National Park & Preserve, Biscayne National Park, etc.
  • Benda or Bendrick for Big Bend National Park.
  • Bona for Wrangell-St. Elias National Park & Preserve’s Mt. Bona.
  • Bristol for Great Basin National Park’s bristlecone pines.
  • Bryce or Brycen for Bryce Canyon National Park.
  • Cadden or Caddie for Acadia National Park’s Cadillac Mountain.
  • Cade for Great Smoky Mountains National Park’s Cades Cove.
  • Canyon for any of the parks featuring a canyon, such as Grand Canyon National Park, Canyonlands National Park, etc.
  • Capitola for Capitol Reef National Park or for Yosemite National Park’s El Capitan.
  • Carl or Carla for Carlsbad Caverns National Park.
  • Caven for Mammoth Cave National Park.
  • Cedar for Congaree National Park’s Cedar Creek.
  • Cinder for Lassen Volcanic National Park’s Cinder Cone.
  • Clark for Lake Clark National Park & Preserve.
  • Clifford or Clifton for Mesa Verde National Park’s Cliff Palace.
  • Cruz for Channel Islands National Park’s Santa Cruz Island.
  • Delica for Arches National Park’s Delicate Arch.
  • Denali for Denali National Park & Preserve.
  • Denison for Katmai National Park & Preserve’s Mt. Denison.
  • Domenica or Domenico for Yosemite National Park’s Half Dome.
  • Douglas for Katmai National Park & Preserve’s Mt. Douglas.
  • Elias for Wrangell-St. Elias National Park & Preserve.
  • Elliott for Biscayne National Park’s Elliott Key.
  • Ever or Everly for Everglades National Park.
  • Faith for Yellowstone National Park’s Old Faithful geyser.
  • Forest for Petrified Forest National Park.
  • Garland for Garland County, Arkansas, where Hot Springs National Park is located.
  • Gates for Gates of the Arctic National Park & Preserve.
  • Guadalupe for Guadalupe Mountains National Park.
  • Gunnison for Black Canyon of the Gunnison National Park.
    • The park was established in 1999, and Gunnison debuted on the baby name charts the very same year. Did one event cause the other?
  • Harding for Kenai Fjords National Park’s Harding Icefield.
  • Hassel for Virgin Islands National Park’s Hassel Island.
  • Jackson for Jackson Hole, where much of Grand Teton National Park is located.
  • Jarvis for Wrangell-St. Elias National Park & Preserve’s Mt. Jarvis.
  • Jefferson for Dry Tortugas National Park’s Fort Jefferson.
  • John for Virgin Islands National Park’s St. John Island.
  • Joshua for Joshua Tree National Park.
  • Kenai for Kenai Fjords National Park.
    • The derivation of Kenai is unknown, but it could come from either Dena’ina Athabascan (“big flat” or “two big flats and river cut-back” or “trees and brush in a swampy marsh”), Russian (“flat barren land”), or Iniut (“black bear”).
  • Kingston or Kingsley for Kings Canyon National Park.
  • Lake for any of the parks featuring lakes, such as Crater Lake National Park, Voyageurs National Park, Lake Clark National Park & Preserve, etc.
  • Lamar for Yellowstone National Park’s Lamar Buffalo Ranch.
  • Lata for the National Park of American Samoa’s Lata Mountain.
  • Lehman for Great Basin National Park’s Lehman Caves.
  • Lewis for Glacier National Park’s Lewis Range.
  • Livingston for Glacier National Park’s Livingston Range.
  • Manning for Saguaro National Park’s Manning Cabin.
  • Mara for Joshua Tree National Park’s Oasis of Mara.
    • In the Serrano language, Mara means “the place of little springs and much grass.”
  • Martin for Katmai National Park & Preserve’s Mt. Martin.
  • Maui, where Haleakalā National Park is located.
  • Mauna for Hawai’i Volcanoes National Park’s Mauna Loa.
  • Miguel for Channel Islands National Park’s San Miguel Island.
  • Norris for Yellowstone National Park’s Norris Geyser Basin.
  • North for North Cascades National Park.
  • Olympia for Olympic National Park.
  • Parker, Parkyr, Parks, Park, or Parke as a tribute to all national parks.
  • Pele as a symbol of Hawai’i Volcanoes National Park.
  • Prairie for any of the parks featuring a prairie, such as Badlands National Park, Theodore Roosevelt National Park, etc.
  • Pratt for Guadalupe Mountains National Park’s Pratt Cabin.
  • Rainier for Mount Rainier National Park.
  • Ranger as a tribute to all national parks and park rangers.
  • Reef for Capitol Reef National Park.
  • Rhodes for Biscayne National Park’s Old Rhodes Key.
  • Rocky for Rocky Mountain National Park.
  • Roosevelt for Theodore Roosevelt National Park.
  • Rosa for Channel Islands National Park’s Santa Rosa Island.
  • Royale or Royal for Isle Royale National Park.
  • Sandy for Great Sand Dunes National Park & Preserve.
  • Sanford for Wrangell-St. Elias National Park & Preserve’s Mt. Sanford.
  • Sequoia for Sequoia National Park.
  • Shenandoah for Shenandoah National Park.
  • Sherman for Sequoia National Park’s General Sherman Tree.
  • Sky or Skye for any of the parks featuring a night sky program, such as Big Bend National Park, Great Basin National Park, etc.
  • Talus for Pinnacles National Park’s talus caves.
  • Theodore for Theodore Roosevelt National Park.
  • Valley for any of the parks featuring a valley, such as Cuyahoga Valley, Death Valley, Kobuk Valley, etc.
  • Verda or Verdell for Mesa Verde National Park.
  • Virginia for Virgin Islands National Park.
  • Windy for Wind Cave National Park.
  • Wolfe for Arches National Park’s Wolfe Ranch.
  • Woodrow or Wilson for Woodrow Wilson, who signed the act that created the NPS.
  • Woodson or Woody for Redwood National and State Parks.
  • Yosemite for Yosemite National Park.
  • Zion for Zion National Park.

For all you national park lovers out there: What other park-inspired names can you come up with?

Sources: List of national parks of the United States – Wikipedia, History (U.S. National Park Service), NPS Site Designations (pdf), Kenai Fjords National Park Profile 2015 (pdf)

Image: Adapted from Zion National Park, Ranger Naturalist Service – LOC


Distinctive Baby Names, State by State

Which baby names are the most disproportionately popular in each U.S. state?

Name blog Republic of Names has your answer — a bunch of cool lists of the most distinctive baby names by state. Here are some highlights for about half of the states.

In Alabama:

  • Crimson – Crimson Tide is the University of Alabama football team.
  • Krimson

In Alaska:

  • Aurora
  • Denali – Denali (Mount McKinley) in Alaska is North America’s highest peak.
  • McKinley

In Arizona:

  • Ariza
  • Helios
  • Nizhoni – Nizhóní is a Navajo word meaning “it/he/she is pretty/beautiful.”
  • Sedona – Sedona is a city in Arizona.

In California:

  • Eztli – Eztli is a Nahuatl (Aztec) word meaning “blood.”
  • Sissi

In Colorado:

  • Matix
  • Story
  • Trindon – Trindon Holliday played pro football in Colorado.
  • Zeppelin

In Florida:

  • Kervens
  • Woodley

In Idaho:

  • Ammon
  • Brigham
  • Hyrum

In Indiana:

  • Jolisa

In Iowa:

  • Kinnick – Kinnick Stadium is where the Iowa Hawkeyes football team plays.

In Kansas:

  • Creighton
  • Ignatius

In Louisiana:

  • Beaux
  • Jacques
  • Marigny – Foubourg Marigny is a New Orleans neighborhood.
  • Montreal

In Maine:

  • Baxter – Baxter is a state park in Maine.
  • Libby

In Mississippi:

  • Swayze

In Missouri:

  • Chancellor
  • Messiah

In Montana:

  • Tuff

In Nevada:

  • Berenice
  • Halo
  • Love

In North Carolina:

  • Chatham

In North Dakota:

  • Briggs
  • McCoy

In Oklahoma:

  • Gentry
  • Jentri
  • Jentry
  • Kutter
  • Tuck
  • Tuff

In Oregon:

  • Alder
  • Autzen – Autzen Stadium is where the Oregon Ducks football team plays.
  • Avenir – Avenir is a French word meaning “future.” It’s also on the Washington state list below. In fact, nearly two-thirds of last year’s Avenirs were born on the west coast: 10 in Washington, 7 in California, 5 in Oregon. Anyone know why?
  • Cedar
  • Forest
  • Maple
  • Opal
  • Pepper
  • Sequoia
  • Sol

In Tennessee:

In Texas:

  • Brazos – Brazos is a Spanish word meaning “arms.” The Brazos River in Texas was originally called Rio de los Brazos de Dios, or “River of the Arms of God.”

In Utah:

  • Korver – Kyle Korver played pro basketball in Utah.
  • Lesieli
  • Navy
  • Parley
  • Viliami

In Vermont:

  • Arlo
  • Juniper

In Washington, D.C.:

  • Egypt
  • Harlem

In Washington (state):

  • Avenir – see Oregon
  • Rio
  • Valkyrie
  • Zephyr

In West Virginia:

  • Remington

In Wisconsin:

  • Charisma
  • Croix
  • Ruthann

In Wyoming:

  • Temperance

See the original post for the rest. You might also be interested in checking out the “most regional” baby names in the US.

Baby Name Needed for Brother of Saylor and Clover

A couple of years ago, we helped reader Michelle brainstorm for a baby names for her second child, a baby girl named Clover. (Michelle already had a son named Saylor.)

I heard from Michelle not long ago, and she’s now expecting #3 (congrats!). The baby is a boy. So far, the favorite name is Caspian but…well, I’ll let Michelle explain:

we really like the name caspian. i like that it’s a literary character [like saylor’s middle name dorian] and even more so i like that it’s a ‘noun’ name so it matches saylor and clover. also being the name of a sea it matches saylor without being too matchy like the name anchor or navy or something.

so that’s the name that i keep going back to but i am having the hardest time with it being 3 syllables. i feel like it doesn’t flow that well- it feels long to me so i KNOW i would want to abbreviate it. and so then he would be cas, casp, or caspy or casper.. which i’m not crazy fond of any of these. plus then you lose the name… i don’t like naming a kid something knowing they will never really go by that name. so i’m looking for a name like caspian.. but looking for a 2 syllable name i guess! i prefer 2 but would use a 1 syllable name if we loved it.

other names we’ve looked at-

cannon- but i feel like it’s forgettable and sounds like a bunch of other names- caiden, cohen, etc.

shepherd- i do like this name. not sure how well it matches our kids but i think i like it?

sage- considering this as potential middle name tho it’s way more popular for a girl’s name now!

my husband suggested voyage today but i feel like that’s too out there/trying to be crazy. i’m open to virtue names but not many good boy ones. not a fan of loyal.

i’ve chewed on booker, shale, atlas and cedar but not feeling it…

a friend also suggested oxlee which is kinda cool but kinda a made up name which i’d rather have a real word.

basil is a family name and i like it but not enough i don’t think..

i’ve spent countless hours thinking and looking and considering… i want to find a name that isn’t in the top 1000 as well. for sure forget it if it’s in the top 500 [i do like the names kingston, river, maddox etc but do not like how trendy they are].. sorry i ramble. :)

so, should i just go with caspian and try to get used to saying 3 syllables all the time? do you have any other suggestions??

Some of my thoughts:

1. Caspian

If you know without a doubt that you’ll shorten it, and you don’t like (and won’t grow to like) any of the shortened versions, there’s no point in forcing it. Picking Caspian would be equivalent to picking a name you don’t like.

That said…when someone tells me he/she “keeps going back to” a particular baby name, I tend to see that as a sign.

Caspian may have 3 syllables, but it’s not that long–especially since the first syllable gets the most stress and the last gets the least. This makes it easy for the name to roll off the tongue.

We all know people with even longer names (e.g. Alexanders, Ariannas) who go by their full names. It’s not strange or outlandish or anything.

If you like Caspian that much, try testing it out. Call the baby Caspian for a week or two and challenge yourself not to shorten the name. Maybe it’ll be easier than you think. Much like picking up a new habit — you have to put in some effort at first, but once it sticks, you’re good.

2. A few more name ideas

All have 2 syllables and are not in the top 1,000 right now.

  • Ansel – Makes me think of nature/the outdoors, thanks to Ansel Adams.
  • Bering – From the sea and strait, both named for the explorer.
  • Canyon – More memorable than cannon, as it gives people a visual.
  • Crispin – Sounds a lot like Caspian.
  • Murray – From the name of Australia’s longest river.
  • Radley – From the character Arthur “Boo” Radley.
  • Rigel – From the star Rigel.

3. Your turn!

  • What are your thoughts on Caspian?
  • Which of the above names do you like best with Saylor and Clover?
  • What other names would you suggest to Michelle and her husband?

10 Never-Ranked Flower, Tree and Herb Names

TansyLooking for flower names that aren’t as run-of-the-mill as Lily, Daisy and Rose? Here are ten great botanical baby names that have never ranked in the U.S. top 1,000:

  • Zinnia – Cute and quirky. Many people I talk to really like this name.
  • Cedar – I see this name being used more and more often for both genders.
  • Maile (MY-lee) – Hawaiian flowering vine commonly used for making leis.
  • Bryony – The variant Briony was the name of the protagonist in Ian McEwan’s book Atonement.
  • Camellia – Especially appropriate for tea-lovers, as tea is made from the leaves of the Camellia sinensis plant.
  • Poppy – Currently the 30th most popular baby name in England and Wales.
  • Azalea – Very distinguished-sounding.
  • Tansy – Said to be derived from a Late Latin word meaning “undying.”
  • Acacia – A genus of thorny tress and shrubs. Reminds me of the name Alicia.
  • Juniper – Bears a resemblance to Jennifer and shortens neatly to June.

There are other good, uncommon floral names (Jonquil, Betony, Saffron) out there as well, but I thought the 10 above would be the most appealing to today’s parents.

UPDATE, 1/5/14: Azalea and Juniper are no longer never-ranked names! Juniper entered the top 1,000 in 2011 and Azalea in 2012.

Name of the Day – Cedar

cedar treesCedars are tall, coniferous trees are known for their fragrant, durable wood. They are native to the mountains of the Himalayan and Mediterranean regions.

The word cedar is ultimately derived from the Greek word kedros, which referred both to cedar and to juniper.

Cedar has never ranked among the most popular U.S. baby names, but I know of two children (so far) with this next-generation nature name — one boy, one girl.

UPDATE: Usage of the baby name Cedar is on the rise!

Image: Cedrus deodara Manali 2 by Paul Evans under CC BY 2.0.