How popular is the baby name Annabel in the United States right now? How popular was it historically? Find out using the graph below! Plus, check out all the blog posts that mention the name Annabel.

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Popularity of the Baby Name Annabel


Posts that Mention the Name Annabel

Name Quotes 88: Booker, Beyoncé, Beatrice

From an interview with Beyoncé’s mother Tina Knowles-Lawson — the youngest of seven siblings — on the podcast In My Head:

A lot of people don’t know that Beyoncé is my last name. It’s my maiden name. My name was Celestine Beyoncé, which, at that time, was not a cool thing, to have that weird name.

[…]

But, all of us have a different spelling. I think me and my brother, Skip, were the only two that had B-E-Y-O-N-C-E.

And, it’s interesting — and it shows you the times — because we asked my mother when I was grown, I was like, ‘Why is my brother’s name spelled B-E-Y-I-N-C-E?’

[…]

[M]y mom’s reply to me was like, ‘That’s what they put on your birth certificate.’

So I said, ‘Well, why didn’t you argue and make them correct it?’

She said, ‘I did one time, the first time, and I was told: ‘Be happy that you’re getting a birth certificate.” Because, at one time, Black people didn’t get birth certificates. They didn’t even have a birth certificate. Because it meant that you really didn’t exist, you know, you weren’t important. It was that subliminal message.

And so I understood that that must have been horrible for her, not to even be able to have her children’s names spelled correctly.

So it was an odd name, it was a weird name, and they were like, ‘How dare you have a French name.’ Like, ‘We’re gonna screw this up real good for you.’ And that’s what they did. So we all have different spellings.

From an Express article that reveals the Queen’s preference for the name Beatrice over the name Annabel:

The names of royal babies are traditionally approved by the Queen. But the monarch is said to have rejected the Duke and Duchess of York’s choice of Annabel for their first child.

The Queen found Annabel too “yuppie”, The Sun reported, and instead suggested Beatrice.

The name Beatrice was royal enough for the head of state but unusual enough to please Sarah, according to the newspaper.

Two quotes from an article in which the author argues that distinctively black names in America emerged long before the civil rights movement:

[I]n the 1920 census, 99% of all men with the first name of Booker were black, as were 80% of all men named Perlie or its variations. We found that the fraction of blacks holding a distinctively black name in the early 1900s is comparable to the fraction holding a distinctively black name at the end of the 20th century, around 3%.

…and second:

[W]e found that names like Alonzo, Israel, Presley and Titus were popular both before and after emancipation among blacks. We also learned found that roughly 3% of black Americans had black names in the antebellum period – about the same percentage as did in the period after the Civil War.

But what was most striking is the trend over time during enslavement. We found that the share of black Americans with black names increased over the antebellum era while the share of white Americans with these same names declined, from more than 3% at the time of the American Revolution to less than 1% by 1860.

From an article in Time about middle names:

Middle names provide an opportunity for people to shift identities throughout their life: the author George Sand wrote that her mother, who had “three baptismal names,” used each of them at various points throughout her life. Pablo Picasso was baptized with a string of more than a dozen names and though, like many people with multiple names, he wasn’t known by all of them, he did test out different combinations: initially signing paintings as P. Ruiz, then trying P. Ruiz Picasso before sticking with Picasso.

From the 2004 book Uqalurait: An Oral History of Nunavut:

Three essential parts made a human in the Inuit view: body, soul, and name. A nameless child was not fully human; giving it a name, whether before or after birth, made it whole. Inuit did not have family surnames. Instead, each person’s name linked him or her to a deceased relative or family friend.

[…]

Is this reincarnation? Elders point out that it is not, for it is not the soul, but rather the spiritual element that is the name — the name-soul — that joins the child, remaining with him and protecting him throughout his life.

(The word in the book’s title, uqalurait, refers to a type of snowdrift with a tip that resembles a tongue (uqaq). It’s a pun because the word for “tongue” in inuttitut (the Canadian dialect of inuktitut) is also the word for “language” — very fitting for a book of oral history.)

From a Bon Appetit article about a particular dijon mustard product:

I mostly love Rich Country because…it’s called Rich Country, which I’m sure you’ll agree is a pretty unnecessarily epic name for a condiment. It sounds like the next great Rick Ross album. Or a Keith Urban-themed Southern waterpark. Or a new bourbon endorsed by a retired pro-wrestler. But it’s not! It’s mustard. And it’s helped to clarify for me that I want my condiments to do more than simply enhance the taste of food I’m preparing—I want them to enhance my life, to spark joy every time I pull them out of the fridge. Indeed, every time I reach for my new favorite mustard, I can’t help but whisper the name aloud as if I were starring in a commercial for it—R-r-r-r-iiiiiiich Coooooountry—and laugh out loud while I’m making lunch. (This could be the quarantine brain talking, but still. It’s the little things, people.)

(Speaking of dijon mustard…)

For more name-related quotes, check out the name quotes category.

Rare Girl Names from Early Cinema: Letter M (part 2)

merna kennedy, actress, cinema, name

Looking for a rare girl name with a retro feel? Here are dozens of ideas. All came straight from very old films that were released from the 1910s to the 1940s.

This is part of a series of posts featuring female names from early cinema. The names below are the second half of the M-list (Me- to My-). The first half includes all the Ma- names.

Enjoy!

Medelina
Medelina was a character played by actress Laura La Varnie in the short film The Nurse at Mulberry Bend (1913).

Meena
Meena was a character played by actress Dorothy Gish in the film Little Meena’s Romance (1916).

  • Usage of the baby name Meena.

Menne O Wa
Meene O Wa was a character played by actress Gertrude Robinson in the short film Before the White Man Came (1912).

Meenie
Meenie Van Winkle was a character played by actress Gertrude Messinger in the film Rip Van Winkle (1921).

Meetah
Meetah was a character played by actress Soledad Jimenez in the film Forbidden Valley (1938).

Megildis
Megildis was a character played by actress Florence Winston in the film The Miracle (1912).

Meggie
Meggie was a character played by actress Jean Cadell in the film Jassy (1947).

  • Usage of the baby name Meggie.

Mehitable
Mehitable was a character played by actress Eugenie Forde in the film The Road to Divorce (1920).

Melahi
Melahi was a character played by actress Maria Montez in the film South of Tahiti (1941).

Melba
Melba was a character name in multiple films, including Mind Your Own Business (1936) and Pinky (1949).

  • Usage of the baby name Melba.

Melisande
Melisande was a character played by actress Renée Adorée in the film The Big Parade (1925).

Melisse
Melisse was a character played by actress Eugenie Besserer in the short film Partners (1912).

Melissy
Melissy was a character played by actress Ethel Wales in the film Lovers’ Lane (1924).

Melitta
Melitta was a character name in multiple films, including The Alcalde’s Conspiracy (short, 1912) and The Cohens and Kellys in Atlantic City (1929).

Mellitta
Mellitta was a character played by actress Lya De Putti in the film Phantom (1922).

Mem
Remember “Mem” Steddon was a character played by actress Eleanor Boardman in the film Souls for Sale (1923).

Memory
Memory Baird was a character played by actress Fritzi Brunette in the film Jacques of the Silver North (1919).

  • Usage of the baby name Memory.

Menote
Menote was a character played by actress Francelia Billington in the short film The Pride of Angry Bear (1913).

Mera
Mera Donovan was a character played by actress Vola Vale in the film The Iron Rider (1920).

  • Usage of the baby name Mera.

Merapi
Merapi was a character played by actress Maria Corda in the film The Moon of Israel (1924).

Mercedita
Mercedita was a character played by actress Margaret Cullington in the film Tropical Love (1921).

Merceita
Merceita Esmond was an actress who appeared in films from the 1910s to the 1920s. She was born in Pennsylvania in 1869.

Mercia
Mercia was a character name in multiple films, including Another Man’s Shoes (1922) and The Sign of the Cross (1932).

  • Usage of the baby name Mercia.

Merle
Merle Oberon was an actress who appeared in films from the 1920s to the 1970s. She was born in British India in 1911. Her birth name was Estelle Merle Thompson.

  • Usage of the baby name Merle.

Merna
Merna Kennedy was an actress who appeared in films from the 1920s to the 1930s. She was born in Illinois in 1908. Her birth name was Maude Kahler.

  • Usage of the baby name Merna.

Merope
Merope was a character played by actress Mrs. A. C. Marston in the short film Madelaine Morel (1916).

Merrilla
Merrilla was a character played by actress Annette Kellerman in the film Queen of the Sea (1918).

Merta
Merta Sterling was an actress who appeared in films from the 1910s to the 1920s. She was born in Wisconsin in 1883.

  • Usage of the baby name Merta.

Mertice
Mertice Kenare was a character played by actress Francelia Billington in the short film The Father (1915).

Meryllyn
Meryllyn was a character played by actress Ollie Kirby in the short film The Barnstormers (1915).

Mescal
Mescal was a character played by actress Bebe Daniels in the film The Heritage of the Desert (1924).

  • Usage of the baby name Mescal.

Mesquite
Mesquite was a character played by actress Marin Sais in the short film The Big Horn Massacre (1913).

Messalina
Messalina was a character name in multiple films, including Safety in Numbers (1930) and I, Claudius (1937).

Meta
Meta was a character name in multiple films, including Misbehaving Ladies (1931) and Out of the Past (1947).

  • Usage of the baby name Meta.

Metta
Metta was a character played by actress Muriel Ostriche in the film The Dormant Power (1917).

  • Usage of the baby name Metta.

Michelna
Michelna Libelt was a character played by actress Vivian Martin in the film The Trouble Buster (1917).

Mici
Mici was a character played by actress Marguerite Clark in the film The Seven Sisters (1915).

Mickey
Mickey was a character played by actress Mabel Normand in the film Mickey (1918).

  • Usage of the baby name Mickey.

Mida
Mida was a character name in multiple films, including Grand Central Murder (1942) and Mystery Broadcast (1943).

  • Usage of the baby name Mida.

Midge
Midge was a character name in multiple films, including The Two-Fisted Sheriff (1925) and Time Out for Romance (1937).

  • Usage of the baby name Midge.

Mifanwy
Mifanwy was a character name in multiple films, including Mifanwy: A Tragedy (1913) and A Welsh Singer (1916).

Mignon
Mignon Anderson was an actress who appeared in films from the 1910s to the 1920s. She was born in Maryland in 1892. Mignon was also a character name in multiple films, including The Drive for a Life (short, 1909) and Mignon (short, 1912).

  • Usage of the baby name Mignon.

Mignonne
Mignonne Golden was an actress who appeared in films in the 1920s. She was born in England in 1904.

Miki
Miki was a character played by actress Olga San Juan in the film Rainbow Island (1944).

  • Usage of the baby name Miki.

Milada
Milada Mladova was an actress who appeared in films from the 1940s to the 1950s. She was born Oklahoma in 1921. Her birth name was Annabel Milada Mraz. Milada was also a character played by actress Luise Rainer in the film Hostages (1943).

  • Usage of the baby name Milada.

Mima
Mima was a character played by actress Dorothy Lamour in the film Road to Singapore (1940).

  • Usage of the baby name Mima.

Mimba
Mimba was a character played by actress Mathilde Comont in the film The Sea Bat (1930).

Mimi
Mimi was a character name in multiple films, including The Call of the Traumerei (1914) and Who’s Your Lady Friend? (1937).

  • Usage of the baby name Mimi.

Mimitta
Mimitta was a character played by actress Iris Ashton in the film The Dancer of the Nile (1923).

Mimsey
Mimsey was a character played by actress Virginia Weidler in the film Peter Ibbetson (1935).

Mimsi
Mimsi was a character played by actress Elsie Ferguson in the film Forever (1921).

Min
Min was a character name in multiple films, including The Fringe of Society (1917) and Min and Bill (1930).

  • Usage of the baby name Min.

Minetta
Minetta was a character played by actress Jessie Ralph in the film The Kid from Texas (1939).

Minette
Minette Bunker was a character played by actress Viola Dana in the film The Great Love (1925).

Minna
Minna Grey was an actress who appeared in films from the 1910s to the 1920s. She was born in England in 1877. Minna Gombell was an actress who appeared in films from the 1920s to the 1950s. She was born in Maryland in 1892. Minna was also a character name in multiple films, including Perils of the Secret Service (1917) and The Oath (1921).

  • Usage of the baby name Minna.

Minnetake
Minnetake was a character played by actress Hedda Nova in the film The Gold Hunters (1925).

Minnette
Minnette Christiewas a character played by actress Edna Murphy in the film Ermine and Rhinestones (1925).

Minta
Minta Durfee was an actress who appeared in films from the 1910s to the 1970s. She was born in California in 1889. Her birth name was Araminta Estelle Durfee.

Minty
Minty Sharpe was a character played by actress Beatriz Michelena in the film A Phyllis of the Sierras (1915).

Miora
Lady Miora was a character played by actress Kate Lester in the film Beau Brummel (1924).

Mirabel
Mirabel was a character played by actress Frances Dee in the film The Gay Deception (1935).

Mirah
Mirah was a character played by actress Ethel Kauffman in the short film Gwendolin (1914).

  • Usage of the baby name Mirah.

Mirami
Mirami was a character played by actress Alma Rubens in the short film Banzai (1913).

Mirandy
Mirandy was a character name in multiple films, including Mirandy Smiles (1918) and His Buddy’s Wife (1925).

Mirella
Mirella was a character played by actress Dria Paola in the film Mr. Desire (1934).

Miriamne
Miriamne Esdras was a character played by mononymous actress Margo in the film Winterset (1936).

Mirza
Mirza was a character played by actress Anna Q. Nilsson in the short film The Second Commandment (1915).

  • Usage of the baby name Mirza.

Mississippi
Mississippi was a character name in multiple films, including Out in Happy Hollow (1914) and Red Barry (1938).

Missouri
Missouri Martin was a character played by Glenda Farrell in the film Lady for a Day (1933).

Missy
Missy Rose was a character played by actress Victoria Spivey in the film Hallelujah (1929).

  • Usage of the baby name Missy.

Mitchette
Mitchette Dubois was a character played by actress Winifred Allen in the film The Long Trail (1917).

Mitsi
Mitsi was a character played by actress Mary Philbin in the film The Rose of Paris (1924).

  • Usage of the baby name Mitsi.

Mittie
Mittie was a character played by actress Dorothy Tree in the film While the Patient Slept (1935).

  • Usage of the baby name Mittie.

Mitty
Mitty Whipple was a character played by actress Fanny Midgley in the film The Heart of Youth (1919).

  • Usage of the baby name Mitty.

Mitzel
Mitzel was a character played by actress Betty Compson in the film Love Me and the World Is Mine (1927).

  • Usage of the baby name Mitzel.

Mitzi
Mitzi was a character name in multiple films, including The Enemy (1927) and My Weakness (1933).

  • Usage of the baby name Mitzi.

Mizzi
Mizzi was a character name in multiple films, including The Marriage Circle (1924) and A Sister of Six (1926).

M’liss
M’liss was a character name in multiple films, including M’Liss (1918) and The Girl Who Ran Wild (1922).

  • Usage of the baby name Mliss.

Moala
Moala was a character played by actress Lucille Moulton in the film The Adorable Savage (1920).

Modesta
Modesta was a character played by actress Goldie Colwell in the film The Yaqui (1916).

Modiste
Modiste was a character played by actress Betty Blythe in the film Stolen Love (1928).

Moina
Moina Robina was a character played by actress Margaret Gibson in the short film The Mystery of the Hidden House (1914).

  • Usage of the baby name Moina.

Moitle
Moitle Perry was a character played by actress Fay Tincher in the short film Foiled Again (1914).

Molee
Molee was a character played by actress Linda Perry in the film The Great Garrick (1937).

Molla
Molla Hansen was a character played by actress Blanche Sweet in the film Why Women Love (1925).

  • Usage of the baby name Molla.

Momba
Momba was a character played by actress Winifred Greenwood in the film The Wonderful Wizard of Oz (1910).

Mombi
Mombi was a character name in multiple films, including The New Wizard of Oz (1914) and The Land of Oz (1932).

Monaei
Monaei Lindley was an actress who appeared in films in the 1930s.

Monah
Monah was a character played by actress Mary Charleson in the short film The Ancient Bow (1912).

  • Usage of the baby name Monah.

Monelle
Monelle Picart was a character played by actress Dany Robin in the film Monelle (1948).

Monika
Princess Monika was a character played by Kathleen Vaughan in the film The Prince and the Beggarmaid (1921).

  • Usage of the baby name Monika.

Moonlight
Moonlight was a character played by actress Ruth Roland in the short film The Loneliness of the Hills (1912).

Moonyean
Moonyean was a character played by actress Jeanette MacDonald in the film Smilin’ Through (1941).

Moonyeen
Moonyeen was a character name in multiple films, including Smilin’ Through (1922) and Smilin’ Through (1932).

Morag
Morag Lannon was a character played by actress Madge Stuart in the film A Gamble with Hearts (1923).

  • Usage of the baby name Morag.

Morella
Morella was a character name in multiple films, including Beyond the Rocks (1922) and Quicker’n Lightnin’ (1925).

  • Usage of the baby name Morella (which debuted in the data the year after Beyond the Rocks came out).

Morgianna
Morgianna was a character played by actress Gertrude Messinger in the film Ali Baba and the Forty Thieves (1918).

Morn
Morn Light was a character played by actress Ora Carew in the film Loot (1919).

Morna
Morna Dabney was a character played by actress Susan Hayward in the film Tap Roots (1948).

  • Usage of the baby name Morna.

Mousali
Mousali was a character played by actress Leah Baird in the film The Miracle (1912).

Movita
Movita was an actress who appeared in films from the 1930s to the 1950s. She was born in Arizona in 1917. Her birth name was Maria Castaneda.

  • Usage of the baby name Movita.

Moya
Moya was a character name in multiple films, including Forked Trails (short, 1915) and My Wild Irish Rose (1922).

  • Usage of the baby name Moya.

Moyna
Moyna MacGill was an actress who appeared in films from the 1920s to the 1960s. She was born in Ireland in 1895. Her birth name was Charlotte Lillian McIldowie. Moyna was also a character played by actress Colleen Moore in the film Come on Over (1922).

Moyra
Moyra was a character played by actress Alice Hollister in the short film The Shaughraun (1912).

  • Usage of the baby name Moyra.

Mozelle
Mozelle Britton was an actress who appeared in films in the 1930s. She was born in Oklahoma in 1912.

Mula
Mula was a character played by actress Mathilde Comont in the film The Sea Beast (1926).

Mulie
Mulie Davenant was a character played by actress Vivian Martin in the film The Wax Model (1917).

Mulvinia
Mulvinia Minchen was a character played by actress Flora Finch in the short film The Mistake in Typesetting (1915).

Muriel
Muriel Ostriche was an actress who appeared in films from the 1910s to the 1920s. She was born in New York in 1896.

  • Usage of the baby name Muriel.

Murieska
Murieska was a character played by actress Carrie Clark Ward in the film His Hour (1924).

Musa
Musa was a character played by actress Helen Gardner in the short film The Still, Small Voice (1915).

  • Usage of the baby name Musa.

Musette
Musette was a character name in multiple films, including La Vie de Boheme (1916) and On Ze Boulevard (1927).

Musidora
Musidora was an actress who appeared in films from the 1910s to the 1920s. She was born in France in 1889. Her birth name Jeanne Roques.

Myone
Myone Madrigal was a character played by actress Betty Francisco in the film Her Night of Nights (1922).

Myrle
Myrle Davis was a character played by actress Heather Angel in the film Time to Kill (1942).

  • Usage of the baby name Myrle.

Myrna
Myrna Loy was an actress who appeared in films from the 1920s to the 1980s. She was born in Montana in 1905. Myrna Dell was an actress who appeared in films from the 1940s to the 1980s. She was born in California in 1924. Her birth name was Marilyn Adele Dunlap. Myrna was also a character name in multiple films, including The Face or the Voice (short, 1912) and Broadway to Cheyenne (1932).

  • Usage of the baby name Myrna.

Myrta
Myrta Bonillas was an actress who appeared in films from the 1920s to the 1930s. She was born in Massachusetts in 1890. Myrta was also a character played by actress Ollie Kirby in the short film The Trap (1917).

  • Usage of the baby name Myrta.

Myrtle
Myrtle Gonzalez was an actress who appeared in films in the 1910s. She was born in California in 1891. Myrtle Stedman was an actress who appeared in films from the 1910s to the 1930s. She was born in Illinois in 1885. Myrtle was also a character name in multiple films, including Salvation Nell (1931) and Rackateers in Exile (1937).

  • Usage of the baby name Myrtle.

Mystie
Mystie Stafford was a character played by actress Miriam Cooper in the short film Tide of Battle (1912).

  • Usage of the baby name Mystie.

Mytyl
Mytyl was a character name in multiple films, including The Blue Bird (1918) and The Blue Bird (1940).

…Which of the above names do you like best?

Source: IMDb

Transient Tessibel

secret of storm country, 1917, movie

Tessibel appeared only once in the Social Security Administration’s baby name data, way back in 1917:

  • 1919: unlisted
  • 1918: unlisted
  • 1917: 7 baby girls named Tessibel [debut]
  • 1916: unlisted
  • 1915: unlisted

For a better picture of what usage looked like around this time, though, let’s check out data from the Social Security Death Index:

  • 1921: 2 people named Tessibel
  • 1920: 1 people named Tessibel
  • 1919: 2 people named Tessibel
  • 1918: 2 people named Tessibel
  • 1917: 6 people named Tessibel
  • 1916: 3 people named Tessibel
  • 1900-1915: zero people named Tessibel

So where did the name Tessibel come from in the 1910s, and why were there extra Tessibels in 1917?

The inspiration was fictional character Tessibel Skinner, invented by author Grace Miller White and first introduced in the 1909 book Tess of the Storm Country. A second book featuring Tess, The Secret of the Storm Country, came out in 1917.

The first book was made into four different films (in 1914, 1922, 1932, and 1960) and the second was made into a single film the same year it was published.

My guess is that the name got a nudge in 1917 thanks to the release of the new story, which was also serialized in the now-defunct magazine Woman’s World. The marketing for the movie — which featured popular actress Norma Talmadge (who went on to star in The Heart of Wetona and Smilin’ Through) — could have been a factor as well.

Do you like the name Tessibel? Do you think it’s a good alternative to names like Isabel and Annabel?

Five-Name Friday: Girl Name for Will’s Sister

five name friday, girl name

It’s an unseasonably warm day, so you decide to take a walk around the neighborhood. At one point you encounter a nice lady with a little boy in a stroller. As the two of you chat, the lady mentions that she and her husband are now expecting a baby girl, but they aren’t sure what to name her. Here’s the gist of the situation:

We are naming baby number 2, our son’s name is William “Will” Michael. I like Annabel, Linley & Ava but he likes McKenna, Keira & Campbell.

“Do you have any suggestions?”

You’re a name-lover, and you could potentially give her dozens of suggestions on the spot. But her young son is starting to get cranky, so you decide to stick to five baby name suggestions so the lady can get on with her day.

But here’s the fun part: Instead of blurting out the first five names you come up with, you get to press a magical “pause” button, think for a bit, and then “unpause” the scenario to offer him the best five names you can think of.

Here are a few things to keep in mind as you brainstorm:

  • Be independent. Decide on your five names before looking at anyone else’s five names.
  • Be sincere. Would you honestly suggest these particular baby names out loud to a stranger in public?
  • Five names only! All names beyond the first five in your comment will be either deleted or replaced with nonsense words.

Finally, here’s the request again:

We are naming baby number 2, our son’s name is William “Will” Michael. I like Annabel, Linley & Ava but he likes McKenna, Keira & Campbell.

Which five baby names are you going to suggest?

[To send in your own 2-sentence baby name request, here are the directions, and here’s the contact form.]

Princess Name Battle – Beatrice vs. Eugenie

While they were married, Prince Andrew and Sarah “Fergie” Ferguson had two daughters. The first was named Beatrice (b. 1988). The second was named Eugenie (b. 1990).

First off, which do you like better? (I’m talking names, not princesses.)

I prefer:

View Results

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Now, a couple of interesting facts:

Beatrice would have been Annabel if her grandmother hadn’t objected. “Her parents’ desire to name her Annabel was vetoed by Queen Elizabeth, aware that this was also the name of a night club favored by the Fergie Set.”

Annabel’s is a members-only restaurant/nightclub in London. A recent review at View London notes that “[i]t’s not as Sloaney as it used to be.”

And Eugenie’s name? You’re not pronouncing it correctly. It’s YOO-genny, said the princess in an interview several years ago. She explained, “Whenever we used to meet foreign people who were struggling with it, my mum and I would help them by saying, ‘It’s like Use Your Knees.’ But whatever. I am now used to every pronunciation.”

Probably doesn’t help that, right after Eugenie was born, Buckingham Palace “requested the name be pronounced “U-jay-nay,” with a French inflection.”

Sources:

  • Farrell, Mary H.J., Jonathan Cooper, Terry Smith, Rosemary Thorpe-Tracey. “Bringing Baby Home.” People 16 Apr. 1990: 55-57.
  • “Fergie is returning home to baby-oh, dear! Now what will press say?” Chicago Tribune 26 Oct. 1988: 6.
  • Greig, Geordie. “Princess Eugenie: Little Princess Sunshine.” Telegraph 4 Mar. 2008.