How popular is the baby name Trevira in the United States right now? How popular was it historically? Find out using the graph below! Plus, check out all the blog posts that mention the name Trevira.

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Popularity of the Baby Name Trevira


Posts that Mention the Name Trevira

Where did the baby name Civona come from?

civona, fabric, clothing, baby name, 1970s
Newspaper ad for Civona sweaters, Nov. 1977

The unique name Civona was a one-hit wonder in the U.S. baby name data during the late 1970s:

  • 1979: unlisted
  • 1978: unlisted
  • 1977: 5 baby girls named Civona [debut]
  • 1976: unlisted
  • 1975: unlisted

Where did it come from?

A type of acrylic fabric called Civona, which was being advertised heavily around that time. The ads often compared the feel of Civona to that of merino wool. Civona’s tagline was: “the touch-me look.”

Like Antron and Qiana, Civona was invented by DuPont. It was put on the market in 1975.

What are your thoughts on the baby name Civona?

Image: Lady Markell Advertisement. San Bernardino Sun 13 Nov. 1977: 35.

Where did the baby name Antron come from?

antron, advertisement, baby name, 1960s
Advertisement in a Georgia newspaper from late 1961

The name Antron began appearing in the U.S. baby name data in 1962:

  • 1969: 11 baby boys named Antron
  • 1968: 6 baby boys named Antron
  • 1967: 7 baby boys named Antron
  • 1966: 5 baby boys named Antron
  • 1965: unlisted
  • 1964: unlisted
  • 1963: unlisted
  • 1962: 6 baby boys named Antron [debut]
  • 1961: unlisted

This one, like Qiana and Trevira, can be traced back to a rather unusual source: synthetic fiber.

In 1960, DuPont trademarked the brand name “Antron” for a new nylon fiber. In DuPont’s Annual Report from 1960, the company explained that, “because of its unusual clover cross-section, [Antron] improves the luster and coverage of many types of apparel and home furnishing fabrics.”

Later the same year, the word Antron started showing up in newspaper and magazine advertisements.

By the second half of the ’60s, the name was regularly appearing in the baby name data — not surprising, as more and more ads were mentioning Antron. An issue of the New York Times from August of 1965, for instance, included a 20-plus-page DuPont advertising supplement called “The Great American Knits” that showcased Antron along with two other DuPont-created synthetic fibers, Orlon and Dacron.

Expectant parents may have found “Antron” more enticing than options like “Orlon” and “Dacron” because it was similar to traditional boy names like Antoine and Anton.

What are your thoughts on the baby name Antron?

Sources: Antron (fabric) – Vintage Fashion Guild, Orlon! Dacron! Antron! The Great American Knits of Fall 1965
Image: Al Dixon advertisement. Thomasville Times-Enterprise 23 Oct. 1961: 6.

Interesting One-Hit Wonder Baby Names

They came, they went, and they never came back!

These baby names are one-hit wonders in the U.S. baby name data. That is, they’ve only popped up once, ever, in the entire dataset of U.S. baby names (which accounts for all names given to at least 5 U.S. babies per year since 1880).

There are thousands of one-hit wonders in the dataset, but the names below have interesting stories behind their single appearance, so these are the one-hits I’m writing specific posts about. Just click on a name to read more. (Names that aren’t links yet have posts coming soon!)

1890s

1900s

  • (none yet)

1910s

1920s

1930s

1940s

1950s

1960s

1970s

1980s

1990s

2000s

2010s

2020s

  • (none yet)

As I discover (and write about) more one-hit wonders in the data, I’ll add names/links to this page. In the meanwhile, do you have any favorite one-hit wonder baby names?

P.S. If this content looks familiar, that’s because you’ve seen it before! I’ve just put it in a new spot. :)

The Baby Name Trevira

trevira, fabric, baby name, 1960s, 1970s
Trevira/Oleg Cassini ad, circa 1968

The name Trevira — not to be confused with the name Tareva — has appeared in the U.S. baby name data only once so far, in 1973:

  • 1975: unlisted
  • 1974: unlisted
  • 1973: 5 baby girls named Trevira
  • 1972: unlisted
  • 1971: unlisted

What inspired it?

Fabric!

Trevira polyester, like Qiana nylon, was one of the branded synthetic fabrics that became trendy during the 1970s.

Trevira was created in Germany in the late ’50s, and by the end of the ’60s could be seen in American retail advertisements that touted the arrival of “The Trevira Era.”

It seems that Trevira hit peak usage among consumers in the early-to-mid ’70s, when it was used to make 1970s fashion staples like flared-leg trousers.

What are your thoughts on the baby name Trevira?

Source: 1970s Disco Fashion – Fashion-Era.com