How popular is the baby name Roxanne in the United States right now? How popular was it historically? Find out using the graph below! Plus, see baby names similar to Roxanne and check out all the blog posts that mention the name Roxanne.

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Popularity of the Baby Name Roxanne

Number of Babies Named Roxanne

Born in the U.S. Since 1880

Posts that Mention the Name Roxanne

Don’t Commit to a Name Pattern Until You Read These 3 Tips

Humans love patterns. Just look last year’s list of popular twin names:

Jacob & Joshua
Daniel & David
Jayden & Jordan
Ethan & Evan
Taylor & Tyler
Gabriella & Isabella
Isaac & Isaiah
Madison & Morgan
Elijah & Isaiah
Ella & Emma

Eight pairs start with the same letter. Seven have the same rhythm. Another seven end with the same letter (and many of these nearly rhyme).

For twins and other multiples, sticking with a name pattern is easy. You know the number of children and their genders ahead of time.

But what if you want a name pattern for an entire sibling set? That can make things tricky. You don’t know how many children you’ll have, or what their genders will be. You also don’t know how your tastes may change over time.

If you’re thinking about a name pattern to cover all of your kids, here are three pieces of advice to consider before you begin:

Don’t lock yourself into something limiting.
Let’s say you like flowers. You have a daughter and you name her Lily. You have another daughter and name her Rose. Then another, Jasmine. And then a fourth, but…you don’t like any other flower names. Iris? Too old. Poppy? Too young. Zinnia? Too weird. Amaryllis will never be spelled correctly. And Daisy is the golden retriever down the street.

Or, let’s say you have a son named Alexander. Then you have another boy, and you decide to name him Xavier so they both have that X in common. Then baby #3–a little girl–comes along. Well, you can’t do Alexis–that’s too close to Alexander. You won’t go near Maxine because you fear maxi pad jokes. Roxanne reminds you too much of that song. Xena reminds you too much of that show. And Beatrix makes you think of rabbits.

When you play chess, you have to think ahead several moves. Look at sibling name patterns the same way. Think ahead as many kids as possible. If you can think of 10 or more usable names that fit the pattern, it’s probably a safe pattern. If you can’t, the pattern may be too limiting to be sustainable.

Consider the pros and cons of visibility.
Have you heard of the Duggars? They have nearly 20 kids, and all of those kids have a J-name. This type of name pattern is one of the easiest to spot. (Especially in large families.)

But name patterns don’t have to be obvious. Let’s say your children will have a whole bunch of aunts and uncles you’d like to honor with baby names. You make a list of their names and simply pick from this list as you have children. In this case, the pattern (aunt and uncle names) is so subtle that it’s basically a family secret.

Here are some example name patterns, ranging from blatant to barely there:

Very conspicuous: First letters (Lou, Leah, Len, Lila)
Rhyme (Aiden, Hayden, Kaeden, Graydon)
Like-sounds (Meredith, Heath, Edith, Griffith)
Theme (Indigo, Scarlet, Tawny, Cyan)
Kinda conspicuous: Alphabetical (Alfred, Bea, Chester, Diana)
Rhythm (Augustus, Miranda, Dakota, Lorenzo)
Source (Juliet, Yorick, Orlando, Cordelia)
Origin (Duncan, Angus, Una, Lachlan)
Inconspicuous: Number of letters (Jason, Frank, Kelly, Alexa)
Spread-out alphabetical (Brian, Elaine, Laura, Paul)
Letter in common (Abigail, Sebastian, Tobias, Isabella)
Chain [last letters into first letters] (Michael, Lauren, Nora, Andrew)

How can you test the visibility of a particular pattern? Make a list of names that fit the pattern. Pick two at random and give them to a friend. Ask that friend what the two names have in common. Did she get it on the first try? Was she unable to guess at all? That should give you a good idea about where the pattern would fall on the spectrum.

Avoid sets of names that have an endpoint.
Your first son is Luke. The next is Sky. The next is Walker. And then…surprise! Son #4. Now what–Anakin? Darth? Chewbacca?

If you start off with a discrete set of names, the universe will laugh at you and you will either:

  • not have enough kids, or
  • have too many kids

to match the number of names in the set. Murphy’s Law in action. So don’t tempt fate–stick with an open-ended theme that could end at two names or continue to ten.

What other suggestions would you give to parents considering name patterns?

Source: SSA


5 Names I Like Less, Thanks to Music

I do my best to stay impartial about names. Sometimes, though, a bad song gets in the way.

When a perfectly good name gets trapped inside a bad song, I can’t help but start disliking the name along with the song.

Which songs have done the most to tarnish various names for me? The top five are:

  1. Come On Eileen (1982) by Dexy’s Midnight Runners
  2. Fact: This is the most annoying song in the history of mankind. Seriously. There was a world-wide vote. (Did you miss it?) Second place went to John Jacob Jingleheimer Schmidt.

  3. My Sharona (1979) by The Knack
  4. The melody is so-so, but the lyrics are just sleazy…especially when you consider that the Sharona who inspired the tune was just 16 when it was written.

  5. Help Me Rhonda (1965) by The Beach Boys
  6. I like The Beach Boys, but this particular song gets on my nerves.

  7. Roxanne (1978) by The Police
  8. Raaaaaaaaaaaaaaawks-anne. Need I say more?

  9. Adia (1997) by Sarah McLachlan
  10. Back in the late ’90s, the U.S. passed something known as the McLachlan Law. The gist of it was this: Every radio station must play Adia by Sarah McLachlan at least 300 times an hour. (Sound impossible? It’s not. Trust me, I was there.)

These are my worst offenders, but there are a few dozen other songs I could have included. (Hey Mickey, you’re so fine…)

What about you — has a song ever negatively influenced your opinion of a name? What song was it, and why do you dislike it?